International Law

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International Law

The area of law dealing with relations between countries. International law consists of many aspects, both written and unwritten, but often refers to matters of war and peace, respect for human rights, international trade and commerce, and similar things. Institutions like the United Nations and the International Criminal Court purport to enforce international law, though their effectiveness is limited by the cooperation given by member states. In general, international law is governed by treaties between sovereign states.
References in periodicals archive ?
Vattel divided the law of nations into four categories: (1) the
11) Emer de Vattel, The Law of Nations 77 (Bela Kapossy & Richard Whatmore eds.
Relying on Blackstone, the Court noted that three types of suits would have been within the law of nations in 1789: offenses against ambassadors, violations of safe conduct, and price capture and piracy.
William Manning's 1875 edition of the Law of Nations notes:
conduct-regulating rule under the ATS and that the law of nations also
The Statute provides, "[t]he district courts shall have original jurisdiction of any civil action by an alien for a tort only, committed in violation of the law of nations or a treaty of the United States.
1990) (Introductory Note to Chapter 2) ("the law of nations later
However, the Roman Foundations of the Law of Nations is not simply about the importance, the difficulties, and the promise of retrieving Gentili and other early modern thinkers; it also, and crucially, problematizes our own exercises in retrieval by reminding us that the sixteenth to eighteenth century thinkers we turn to as our intellectual and existential "foundations" were themselves engaged in their own exercises of retrieval.
In support of this argument the author musters an impressive arsenal texts and authorities from Roman legal codices, Homeric epics, and the emergence of the law of nations, to German idealist philosophy, and the modern history of warfare.
Harvey cites Chief Justice Story's opinion where he noted an "explicit definition of the Law of Nations was almost impossible because '[o]ffences, too, against the law of nations, cannot, with any accuracy, be said to be completely ascertained and defined in any public code decognized by the common consent of nations.