large-cap


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Related to large-cap: Market cap, Mid-cap

Large-cap

A stock with a high level of capitalization, usually at least $5 billion market value.

Large-Capitalization

Describing a publicly-traded company with large amount of market capitalization. Though there is no fixed measurement, a large-capitalization company typically has a market capitalization over $5 billion or $10 billion. Some brokerages or exchanges have slightly different definitions of large-capitalization. Some indexes track large-capitalization companies, as do some exchange traded funds. See also: Mid-Cap, Low-Cap.

large-cap

1. Of or relating to the common stock of a big corporation that has considerable retained earnings and a large amount of common stock outstanding. Large-cap stocks, which are generally well known, include the ones listed in the Dow Jones Averages. See also mid-cap.
2. Of or relating to a mutual fund that chooses to hold a portfolio of large-cap stocks. Large-cap funds tend to have a more stable net asset value than either microcap or mid-cap funds.
References in periodicals archive ?
Large-cap companies have struggled to generate organic top-line growth, yet they are sitting on historically high levels of cash.
Mach's departure, EVM's large-cap value team will consist of Edward Perkin, John Crowley and Matthew Beaudry.
Ironically, while several Internet stocks might qualify as large-cap based on their market value, they're really small companies in terms of sales and employment.
large-cap stock picks into one convenient portfolio," Mr.
Wilson holds Fidelity Balanced Fund (FBALX) and Fidelity Asset Manager Fund (FASMX), both of which generally hold 50% to 60% of their assets in large-cap stocks and the remainder mainly in bonds issued by the federal government and its agencies.
LONDON -- In 2009 the top 20 large-cap North American independent exploration and production companies decreased their expenditure on acquisitions by 60% in 2009.
The negative trends affecting the market this year -- terrorist fears, Corporate America's credibility, uncertain economic prospects, and high valuations -- have generally hit large-cap stocks harder than small-caps.
Whether or not it's time for small-caps to rise "all depends on their earnings outlook relative to large-cap stocks," says Alston Paige, who runs the Loomis Sayles Midcap Value fund (800-633-3330).
Proved Oil & Gas Reserves of the Top 10 Large-Cap Canadian Independent Exploration and Production (E&P) Companies Decreased by 15.

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