Landlord

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Landlord

A property owner who rents property to a tenant.

Landlord

A person who owns real estate and rents it to someone, allowing the renter to live and/or use the real estate in exchange for a fee. The fee is also called rent and is usually paid once per month. In exchange for the rent, the landlord is responsible for the basic upkeep of the property. For example, if the roof collapses, the landlord, rather than the renter, must pay for it. Landlords usually may not deduct the interest they pay on the mortgages of their properties from their taxable incomes, but the rent can provide a steady income with little or no actual work. A female landlord is called a landlady. See also: Passive income.

landlord

The owner of property rented to another. The landlord's interest is called a reversionary interest, while the tenant's interest is possessory.

References in classic literature ?
I will not say that in this accommodating proposition the landlady had no regard whatever to the possible reward of her good nature in the ultimate possession of the locket and ear-rings: indeed, the effect they would have in that case on the mind of the grocer's wife had presented itself with remarkable vividness to her rapid imagination.
But if you want the things again, you'll write before long," said the landlady, "because when two months are up, we shall make up our minds as you don't want 'em.
The landlady had a sensible suggestion to make--the landlady was the next person who spoke.
The landlady and I recognized him at the same moment.
The landlady, drawing the inevitable inference from the words that she had just heard, looked from me to my mother-in-law in a state of amazement, which paralyzed even her tongue.
said the landlady in a high, sing-song, cheery voice.
It is very bad weather, monsieur,' said the landlady.
The landlady having given her directions for the new guest's entertainment to her husband, who acted as cook to the Break of Day, had resumed her needlework behind her counter.
cried the landlady, raising her eyes from her work, opening them very wide, and tossing her head on one side.
He was a wicked wretch,' said the landlady, 'and well merited what he had the good fortune to escape.
The landlady flung a pair of lady's shoes into the yard, and bustled away.
The landlady was about to enter a very violent protest against this proceeding, and had already given vent to an indignant inquiry whether Mr.