Labor Intensive

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Labor Intensive

Describing an industry or sector in which it is difficult to produce a good or service without a large amount of labor. Labor intensive industries require either a large number of employees or a large number of hours worked by employees, or both, in order to be successful. Labor intensity may be quantified by taking a ratio of the cost of labor (i.e. wages and salaries) as a proportion of the total capital cost of producing the good or service. The higher the ratio, the higher the labor intensity. Labor intensive industries may control costs in bad economies by laying off workers. Examples of labor intensive industries include agriculture, mining, and hospitality.
References in periodicals archive ?
62 million) for labor-intensive infrastructure projects, which opened up about six million job opportunities, Game added.
Given this expansion, the indirect labor content of exports in unskilled-labor-intensive sectors rose from 14% of total employment generated by labor-intensive sectors to 42% (excluding employment generated by maquila industry).
Fitch believed that labor-intensive manufacturers in China will try to mitigate wage increases by reducing their labor intensity or by moving their operations to places with lower wages.
Targeting "lo-hardy" students, regardless of their background, for enrollment in retention intervention programs might permit more efficient usage of these expensive, labor-intensive efforts that are best suited for those who truly need them.
But managing different levels of protection is a labor-intensive process, and tight policy control is required to certify that critical business data is never under-provisioned.
To compete in an increasingly competitive market, foundries are looking for techniques that eliminate labor-intensive and inexact practices, allowing them to produce cost-efficient, high-quality castings.
In contrast to Third World countries, growth economies moved from labor-intensive production to capital-intensive and energy-intensive production.
As discussed below, economic theory predicts, and empirical evidence indicates, that lax enforcement of workers' rights encourages prolonged reliance on less-skilled labor-intensive activities and does not encourage economy-wide capital formation and long-term growth.
In addition, the work is extremely labor-intensive, and Hendy, along with his team of seven sewers, often stay overnight to process the last-minute orders that are typical of the business.
This distortion of the natural, and the artist's extraordinarily time-consuming labors, speak both to the process of cultivating cotton (one of the most labor-intensive cash crops) and to the way slaves were often worked to death.
But no matter how labor-intensive a university might be, one would expect that the recent computerization of tedious, formerly manual tasks such as registration and billing would have reduced the number of administrative employees.
The name change reflects the organization's increasing involvement with diverse industries as they seek to certify ethical working conditions in labor-intensive manufacturing facilities around the world.

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