family

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Related to kinship group: nuclear family, Status group

family

Traditionally, people who are related by blood or marriage. The term can mean many different things depending on the circumstances. Most statutes have a section devoted to “definitions” that will tell you the intended definition of words used in the law. For example, the concept of what constitutes a family may be important in zoning cases for single-family housing or apartment restrictions against non-family members living in the apartment with the tenant.

References in periodicals archive ?
Although this might vary among different regions and from one individual family to another, it appears that the feature common to all the regions which still hold matriliny alive is the existence and legal recognition of the ancestral land of kinship groups or families.
As a result, the elected village cadres did not provide public goods to the whole village but instead provided private goods to their own kinship group.
Research participants tended to use the term "zaat" meaning caste, interchangeably with "biradri" meaning kinship group.
A child will learn about themselves through the teachings and how they will fit into the community as a member of a kinship group.
This automatically creates a new kinship group, which is defined by a shared emotion.
Iatmul kinship groups are based on descent from the male ancestor.
Therefore, if the sky is 'a mirror of social relations and structures on the ground' then the sky has the potential to be as complex as any kinship group.
Although Ostrom wishes to preserve the constitutional founders' vision, his undemanding of democracy has little relationship to government as we know it in the United States; for him, democracy exists primarily in informal relationships in the family, kinship group, and local community.
Any object can be a totem, its sacred character being ascribed to it by kinship group rather than derived from any intrinsic qualities.
The conference organizers naturally had as their frame of reference the zaibatsu, the giant business combines of pre-1945 Japan whose prime characteristics included closed ownership by a family or kinship group.
Rather than approaching Kateryn Parr narrowly as an individual, James places her within the context of her family social system, the kinship group with which she identified and remained close throughout her life.
These studies have approached the household not simply as a kinship group but also as a network of military-political patrons and clients who ruled a particular area, and as a place where women could play central roles.