family

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Related to kinship group: nuclear family, Status group

family

Traditionally, people who are related by blood or marriage. The term can mean many different things depending on the circumstances. Most statutes have a section devoted to “definitions” that will tell you the intended definition of words used in the law. For example, the concept of what constitutes a family may be important in zoning cases for single-family housing or apartment restrictions against non-family members living in the apartment with the tenant.

References in periodicals archive ?
Kinship is an important element in people's daily lives, society, and politics in rural China, Previous studies have found that kinship groups in a village are often in conflict with each other and hence villages with multiple kinship groups tend to have worse village governance performance.
From this early division, we see how these immigrant kinship groups helped to construct the figure of Shotoku, whom he describes as a literary creation distinct from the historical Kamitsumiya--one of the prince's other names.
But descent is not the only means of tracing kinship; 'groups based on descent from a common ancestor are not the only kind of kinship groups, but they are the ones that anthropologists have concentrated on' (Fox 1967: 51).
precedence of local history and custom, encompassing relationships between kinship groups, and shared norms and values
Clans were dispersed clusters of people belonging to kinship groups presided over by a hierarchy of male rulers.
Most significantly, Como teases out, through meticulous textual and cultural analysis, clues that point to the extraordinary influence of a cluster of immigrant kinship groups.
Following a review of recent anthropological studies of war, case studies of low intensity warfare in Africa and their effects on kinship groups, villages, and everyday social interactions are presented.
36) Burial rites have been very important in West African religions, because of the powerful position of ancestors; ancestors, both those who passed away a long time ago and those of more recent memory, are revered as founders of villages and kinship groups throughout West Africa, where funeral ceremonies are long, complex, and expensive.
He examines the semiotic bases for cultural psychology, the interdependence of social webs in society and community, the construction of the dialogical self and dualities in meaning, minimal communities such as families and kinship groups, cultural wholes, perceiving thinking as a cultural process, guiding the internalization and externalization process, and methodologies of cultural psychology, including the systemic, qualitative and idiographic.
Exchange, according to Weiner, does not create equivalence but difference, and the control of inalienable possessions by kinship groups, through KWG, makes possible the emergence of rank and political hierarchy.