Kin


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Kin

A unit of weight in Japan equivalent to 600 grams.
References in periodicals archive ?
Next of kin of patients with MS were recruited from earlier research with 61 MS patients (Isaksson, 2007; Isaksson, Gunnarsson, & Ahlstrom, 2007).
Mountain Resources is to pay Kin Communications a fee of USD7,500 per month and will provide Kin 350,000 stock options of the company at a minimum of USD0.
Microsoft began selling the Kin phones with Verizon Wireless in May.
Salz also points out that the KIN phones and C3 aren't the first phones to go down the social path: London-based mobile manufacturer INQ brought its own social mobile phone to market more than a year before Microsoft and Nokia.
The big two features unique to Kin are "Loop" and "Spot".
Kin automatically backs up text messages, call history, photos, videos and contacts, in an attempt to soothe fears of data loss.
Verizon said it will start selling the Kin phones online in early May and in stores shortly thereafter.
The Coroner's Office is now trying to trace Mr Barclay's next of kin and it is believed he may have had a nephew, called Ian Barclay, from the Birkenhead area.
Questions regarding the ACOAs' perceptions of kin and fictive kin relationships were explored by asking the participants to describe their relationships with relatives or neighbors while growing up.
Fast forward 15 years and you can add KIN to the mix of powerful ladies who own the mic.
A longitudinal sample of linked records for 21,914 kin children and 10,108 non-kin children was created, and a random subsample of 1,500 children in nonkinship care was matched to the kinship sample by using PSM.
FORMAL lines of communication between jockeys injured on the racecourse and their next of kin were opened up for the first time yesterday, thanks to an initiative driven by the Professional Jockeys' Association and the Racecourse Association.