kill

(redirected from killed with kindness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

Kill

To cancel an order that has not yet been filled. See also: Fill-or-kill, Immediate-or-cancel.

kill

To halt a trade before sending a confirmation of it.
References in periodicals archive ?
An Approach to the Main Plot of Thomas Heywood's A Woman Killed with Kindness.
Money, murder, women, and tragedy seem to figure in different ways in A Yorkshire Tragedy) The Miseries of Enforced Marriage, and A Woman Killed with Kindness.
8 Henry V is at the Liverpool Everyman on Tuesday and Friday next week with a matinee on Wednesday; A Woman Killed With Kindness is at the Everyman on Thursday with a matinee on Saturday.
The company will also stage A Woman Killed With Kindness, a Yorkshire tragedy written by Thomas Heywood.
For Michael McClintock, Heywood's A Woman Killed with Kindness employs the affective impact of tragedy to enable its central women, Anne Frankford and Susan Mountford, to morally transform Sir Francis Acton and Master Frankford.
Kinney, "Arden and the Archives"; Jan Stirm, "'This Strumpet Serves Her Own Ends': Teaching Class and Service in Early Modern Drama"; Rebecca Ann Bach, "Teaching the Details of Race and Religious Difference in Renaissance Drama"; Christina Luckyj, "Historicizing Gender: Mapping Cultural Space in Webster's The Duchess of Malfi and Cary's The Tragedy of Mariam"; Lori Schroeder Haslem, "Tragedy and the Female Body A Materialist Approach to Heywod's A Woman Killed With Kindness and Webster's
Chapter 3 on "Domestic Tragedy and Private Life" analyzes Heywood's A Woman Killed with Kindness, the anonymous sensational plays Arden of Faversham, A Yorkshire Tragedy, and A Warning for Fair Women, and Yarrington's Two Lamentable Tragedies, and Ch.
Heywood is known primarily for his 1603 tragedy, A Woman Killed with Kindness, but Paul Merchant has done students of early modern English theater a valuable service in providing superbly edited texts of three other of Heywood's best plays: the 1604 comedy, The Wise-Woman of Hogsdon, the 1624 tragicomedy, The English Traveller, and the 1624 manuscript romance, The Captives.