kanban

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Related to kanbans: Mass customization, Jidoka

Kanban

A scheduling system indicating how many goods one must produce in a given period of time, how one must produce them, and by when they must be completed. It developed in Japan as a means to achieve just-in-time inventory control.

kanban

a Japanese term meaning ‘card’. It is used to describe part of the control mechanism for JUST-IN-TIME (JIT) and is at the centre of all JIT operations. A kanban is used to authorize the previous stage of production to make components. As such the system operates as a pull mechanism. A kanban system, to work successfully, should operate within the following conditions.
  1. A relatively stable demand pattern, with probably no more than 10% variation either side of the average.
  2. QUALITY is imperative, defects for components in the system must be at a minimum. This is because kanbans normally work at preset component levels.
  3. Good operator motivation. This is essential because a kanban is essentially a short-term, minute by minute inventory control mechanism. The simplest kanban is known as the kanban square. Here a square card (hence the name) is placed between two workstations. When the square is full (to a preset level) work at the previous station stops. When work is pulled from the square by the next operation (hence the alternative term ‘pull-system’) then work at the previous operation may start again. Kanbans exist in a number of variations, as stationary points attached to a work centre or as cards attached to an inventory bin, the principal remains the same however. See LEAN MANUFACTURING.
References in periodicals archive ?
i] = {Node Capacity, WIPCAP, Node 1 Kanbans, Node 2 Kanbans, Node 3 Kanbans}, S = Service Level, and W = Average WIP.
When I ask where this mysterious kanban is I'm always told it's "right here", and the person always points to racks of inventory.
However, if there is no demand and the FG Kanban becomes stagnant, then the EMS must reserve the right to transfer ownership of the product at an agreed-upon time period, typically less than 45 days.
Japanese manufacturing has gained a reputation for innovative thinking and developments, and the current Western focus on quality, just-in-time delivery, waste and defect reduction, and kanban systems all have their origins in Japanese manufacturing companies.
The problem is that the MRP system is an order-driven push system that relies on forecasts of future demand rather than a kanban pull system that's based on actual demand via a visual consumption-replenishment signal.
In its most common form, a Kanban is simply a card that contains production information.
In this reported system, MRP orders and kanbans are both used as production triggering signals.
QAD Lean Manufacturing helps manufacturers effectively use kanban systems to align inventory with demand for pull-based replenishment.
Davis (15) used simulation to study the effect of the number of Kanbans on the time an order spends on the shop floor.
DemandStream provides factory floor management of Dynamic Kanbans, Lean Material Flow management and supply chain material/demand signals with visibility to both vendors and customers.
The manufacturer also will begin testing QAD Kanban Visualization this month as part of its efforts to better synchronize suppliers' deliveries and customers' needs and minimize inventory holdings, for more efficient, cost-effective operations.