corner

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Corner a Market

1. To own a significant enough amount of a stock to be able to manipulate its price. More specifically, an investor corners a market when he/she owns so many shares in a company that he/she can trigger a sell off if he/she dumps the stock. For this reason, persons and institutions owning or buying more than a certain percentage of shares in a company must register with the SEC and are subject to certain restrictions.

2. To have the greatest market share in a particular industry without having a monopoly. Companies that have cornered their markets usually have greater leeway in their decisions; for example, they may charge higher prices for their products without fear of losing too much business. Large companies, such as Wal-Mart or Microsoft, are considered to have cornered their markets. See also: Gorilla.

corner

Significant control over a sufficient portion of a particular security so that it is possible to control the security's price. Others wishing to purchase the security, especially to cover short positions, are forced to buy it at an artificially high price. Corners were popular in the early 1900s when the securities markets were virtually unregulated. See also natural corner.

corner

To acquire a big enough position in a particular security or commodity so that control over its price and supply is achieved.

corner

vb. to buy or attempt to buy up all the supplies of a particular product on the MARKET, thereby creating a temporary MONOPOLY situation with the aim of exploiting the market.
References in periodicals archive ?
There is a nice busy shopping street just round the corner so it would be a great spot for us," he said.
Mr Fildes was plucked to safety off Puerto Rico and discovered his rescuer lives just round the corner from his home in Warsash, Hants.
With Valentine's Day just round the corner, Consumer Editor CATHERINE HENDRICK speaks to one of the Jewellery Quarter's diamond experts about what has been done to stop the corrupt trade and restore the industry's sparkle.