References in classic literature ?
The Journalist tried to relieve the tension by telling anecdotes of Hettie Potter.
Most of us hearers were in shadow, for the candles in the smoking-room had not been lighted, and only the face of the Journalist and the legs of the Silent Man from the knees downward were illuminated.
Not a journalist was able to pass through the gate of the Glandier yesterday.
And it is only fair to state, with regard to modern journalists, that they always apologise to one in private for what they have written against one in public.
The consequences are thus described by the Journalist already quoted.
It might truly be said of him, as for many journalists in authority, that his most familiar emotion was one of continuous fear; fear of libel actions, fear of lost advertisements, fear of misprints, fear of the sack.
At the opera he talked with journalists, for he stood high in their favor; a perpetual exchange of little services went on between them; he poured into their ears his misleading news and swallowed theirs; he prevented them from attacking this or that minister on such or such a matter, on the plea that it would cause real pain to their wives or their mistresses.
Disregarding the anger in his stare, I pointed out that whether the journalist was well- or ill-informed, the concern of the friends of these ladies was with the effect the few lines of print in question had produced--the effect alone.
That sobered him a little; and when he saw Henderson, the London journalist, in his garden, he called over the palings and made himself understood.
Never at any time have I been able to bear the flunkeyishness which one meets in the Press of the world at large, but more especially in that of Russia, where, almost every evening, journalists write on two subjects in particular namely, on the splendour and luxury of the casinos to be found in the Rhenish towns, and on the heaps of gold which are daily to be seen lying on their tables.
So say the third class of historians who regard all historical persons, from monarchs to journalists, as the expression of their age.
It was a very simple-hearted fraud, and it was all done with an innocent trust in the popular ignorance which now seems to me a little pathetic; but it was certainly very barefaced, and merited the public punishment which the discoverer inflicted by means of what journalists call the deadly parallel column.

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