job sharing

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Job Sharing

The practice in which two or more persons work part-time in the same position that ordinarily one full-time person would fill. Job sharing may reduce employer costs as a company may not provide benefits to part-time employees. Likewise, it can be beneficial for employees with unusual scheduling needs. For example, parents of young children or persons active in religious communities may share jobs. However, it can be difficult, as lack of communication between the job sharers can cause problems for the company and reduce efficiency.

job sharing

the carrying out by two or more individuals between them of the duties of a particular JOB, each being paid pro rata according to the number of hours worked. For instance, two people might share a 40 hours per week job with each working 20 hours and each paid half the wage or salary attached to the post. The advantage to job sharers is that both may work part-time in jobs that are more highly paid than is usual for most PART-TIME jobs. It is more common for potential sharers to approach employers with a job-share package than for employers to initiate this form of working themselves. Employers are generally wary of job sharing because it can increase employment costs (for example INSURANCE payments), because the division of duties and responsibilities may be difficult to specify, and because the competencies of job sharers may be perceived as unbalanced.
References in periodicals archive ?
Garcia said job sharers need to be self-starters and will likely need to shepherd each step of the process themselves.
Job sharers often have young children or older relatives who require care, but others may have an entrepreneurial goal, a hobby or just want more time for themselves.
Job sharing requires a bit of extra effort by all involved, but the benefits to job sharers, offices and to the work-life culture make it worth the investment.
The department based these conclusions on debriefing the job sharers and their supervisors, as well as evaluating the employees' work products.
Supervisors have indicated that it has worked well based on positive feedback from current job sharers and exit interviews with those who have left the program.
The success of the program is based on the productivity and satisfaction of the job sharers and the length of time the program has existed.
13) Second, job sharers may feel that they achieve proportionately more than full-time employees and, thus, receive inadequate pay.
Do not allow communications between job sharers to break down and consider the possible, damage to continuity if one member of staff starts a job and then leaves it to another.
The literature also suggests that job sharing leadership roles can fail due to incompatibility of job sharers due to personality conflicts, split leadership, reduced accountability and inconsistencies in working may have a negative effect on a leadership role.
Another interesting finding of the study was the need for compatibility of the CNC's, as Cooper and Spencer (1997) also suggest that it may be useful for job sharers to self-identify to ensure compatibility.