Job Analyst

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Job Analyst

A person who determines the duties of a job, the nature of performance evaluation, the costs associated with hiring someone and so forth. Job analysts help establish whether or not hiring someone is cost effective. A job analyst may work in human resources.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first method pertains to 'Job analysts (JA) Method' (objective approach), in which the professional job analysts grade the jobs and recommend the minimum educational requirements for a certain job/occupation [Haratog (2000); Battu, et al.
No statistics, however, is available for working mothers with young children but job analysts said it could be as high as 25 per cent of the total workforce.
He presents some 200 job descriptions as models for job analysts and recruitment officers who can use them as a basis for writing their own; the descriptions might also be of interest to job seekers and those starting new careers.
Job analysts expect 29,000 new positions in the Valley this year, adding to an estimated 800,000 jobs at some 70,000 Valley businesses.
Job analysts solicit critical incidents from incumbent officers and/or their supervisors.
Questions were drawn from activities that job analysts noted that workers perform.
The current information contained in the O*NET database was developed by job analysts using the O*NET skill-based structure, but according to the Labor Department's Employment & Training Administration, future data will come directly from the workers and employers themselves.
Initially, information is gathered directly by full-time, highly trained job analysts who observe and interview job incumbents and supervisors working in a specific occupation (an occupation is a class of jobs with common requirements).
That leaves us with the last, and most direct, measure of job content changes--observation by job analysts of actual job-skill requirements.
It was also intended to interpret professional shorthand into phrases that could be better understood by job analysts without knowledge of a particular profession.
The MEED 3000 System will provide a new level of technology for job analysts working with employers to meet the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990.