jeopardy

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jeopardy

(1) Danger,hazard,peril.Mortgaged property is said to be in jeopardy because it might be taken by foreclosure.(2) Subjected to the possibility of criminal punishment,including fines.The constitutional protection against double jeopardy has been held to apply to fines,such as might be levied against a company for violation of housing discrimination laws.

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The CBA has not taken a position on whether the transfer of an interest in an accountancy practice to a revocable living trust will jeopardize its qualification as a public accountancy firm.
First, immature staff behavior jeopardizes camper safety and camper discipline.
If a taxpayer violates the prohibited transaction rules, he or she jeopardizes the IRA's tax-free status.
Conclusion: The IRS concluded that Hospital B did not jeopardize its tax-exempt status in this recruitment effort because objective evidence (the needs assessment) demonstrated a need for pediatricians in the community served by Hospital B, and the incentives paid to the physician recruit were reasonably related to causing the physician to establish and maintain a full-time practice in the community.
Awareness and action by the counselor may avert a situation that jeopardizes the rehabilitation plan and goals, and may lead to a loss of sobriety.
Health Care Exemption for Employees Will Jeopardize Resident Safety
Section 4944 imposes an excise tax on a private foundation that invests any amount in such a manner as to jeopardize the carrying out of any of its exempt purposes.
After discussing the negative income and employment tax aspects of such an informal plan, the tax adviser must determine whether the proposed reimbursement policy could jeopardize the company's S election.
He added that Cuban authorities should "not allow their decisions to jeopardize the integrity of the Cuban revolution.
Rockrose, in a public statement, says: "We are happy to reach an accommodation in the interests of preservation that will not jeopardize the plan to bring much needed new housing to downtown Manhattan.
While the small menstrual cycle decrease probably does not jeopardize fertility or health, it "may indicate potential endocrine effects on a population level," Mendola's team says.