Issue

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Issue

A particular financial asset.

Issue

A set of securities that a company or government offers for sale. That is, when a company sells stocks or bonds to the public (or offers them for private placement) the collection of stocks or bonds is said to be an issue. If the company or government is selling a set for the first time, it is said to be making a new issue. Typically, issues of securities may be bought and sold on the open market.

issue

A particular grouping of an organization's securities. For example, General Motors has a number of different issues of preferred stock listed on the New York Stock Exchange.

issue

To sell securities in the primary market. For example, in late 1996, Florida Panthers Holdings, Inc., owner of the NHL hockey team, issued 2,700,000 Class A shares of common stock at a price of $10 per share.

Issue.

When a corporation offers a stock or bond for sale, or a government offers a bond, the security is known as an issue, and the company or government is the issuer.

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His first wife Dr Zareen Ara Zardari, who was issueless and died in November 2002.
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