irrevocable

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Related to irrevocability: ameliorating, two-fold

irrevocable

Not capable of being revoked. An offer to sell at a certain price can be revoked at any time before acceptance. An irrevocable offer to sell cannot be revoked, but it should always have an expiration date.

References in periodicals archive ?
Eliot shows, however, that perfectionist debt-cancellation is a psychic swerve from the irrevocability of harm.
149) Nor did the Court address the appellant's submission that irrevocability does not have to be actually considered by the testators where their circumstances, such as age and years of marriage, indicate that revocation of the wills would not be contemplated.
The choice of the bird and setting, the growth of suspense in the narrative line of the poem, the menacing irrevocability of the refrain and strong sonorous sounds stress the importance of emotion and point to the mind's irrational powers.
These themes include religious and moral arguments; issues related to deterrence, incapacitation, irrevocability, discrimination and arbitrariness; constitutional concerns; and practical issues.
Moral questions that drive characters in the Iliad--the role of good luck and cleverness in keeping mere mortals from grim fate, the irrevocability of human destiny--are for Apollonius commonplaces.
For while the goal of Leviathan is to provide a logically compelling model of absolute sovereignty and irrevocable contract, the exception to this rule of irrevocability is the right of self-defense consistently invoked by parliamentary critics of the king.
Generally, trust law is supportive of the irrevocability of trusts, for they are deemed to be irrevocable unless the settlor has expressly reserved the right to revoke.
White reminds us that all those involved in a century of theological dispute accepted God's predestination as they rejected the alleged Pelagianism of popery but differed on the irrevocability of divine decrees and man's role in his own salvation.
How better to express the irrevocability of human actions, and the unique power of society, like the earth itself, to accept its dead?
The last line of the poem is ambivalent; it communicates both the irrevocability, finality, and cruelty of death and the Christian belief of the deathlessness of the soul:
It concluded that society should not penalize women by demanding a degree of certainty and irrevocability that is not required of men or women in making other important life choices.

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