middleman

(redirected from interlocutor)
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middleman

a person or firm which acts as an intermediary between a seller of a good or service and the buyer of that good or service. See WHOLESALER, AGENT, MARKET INTERMEDIARY.

middleman

a trader or firm that provides a service by acting as an intermediary between two parties, frequently producer to consumer or seller to purchaser. WHOLESALERS may be considered middlemen for they frequently act as distributors from producers to retailers on a COMMISSION or mark-up basis. ESTATE AGENTS or insurance brokers are further examples.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, particles were also used to increase social distance, which is essentially to emphasize differences instead of align with one's interlocutor.
According to Hakan, it seems difficult for Davutoy-lu to be considered "the only interlocutor," unless President Erdoy-an is no longer the leader whose decision on every issue is wondered about the most, unless the government's decisions are no longer Erdoy-an's orders but Davutoy-lu's and unless Erdoy-an stops acting as the interlocutor to those who should in fact address Davutoy-lu.
Speaking at a joint press conference with the President of the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus (TRNC) Dervis Eroglu in Lefkosa, Erdogan said that Turkey would never consider the Greek Cypriot administration an interlocutor and sit at the table with them.
The Interlocutor wants to be in the center of the action.
Gestures along with the linguistic element, which is the direct question used by the son, can reinforce the intentions and expectations of the interlocutor according to the interlocutor's response (GOFFMAN, 2002).
Se elaboro un sistema de categorias (Navarro y Hernandez, 2004; Navarro, 2007; Navarro y San Martin, 2007) dividido en dos grupos: Regulacion y ajustes de la comunicacion y Regulacion basada en el interlocutor como centro de interes.
So it is fundamental to have a very good question prepared for the start of the interview, preferably a precise and challenging one, a question which matches the concerns and the temperament of your interlocutor.
Rather than defending Socrates, as was often done, against criticism for dialectical tactics taken to be unacceptable and for various logical fallacies, by linking Plato to ancient literary practices of ambiguity and linking his Socrates to ancient dialectical theories (Chapter 4), C finds a deliberate and creative use of ambiguity (Chapter 3) that is philosophically defensible because it aims at the moral improvement of the interlocutor.
The speaker is responsible for imparting the message clearly so that the interlocutor could easily decode it (Ting-Toomey 1999:101, 209).
The designated cultural rememberer or collector is thus presented as equivalent both to the absent interlocutor or stranded companion, and to the public fool whose storytelling blends salutary mockery with gleeful revenge.
Such a stimulus can be provided by an interlocutor, a partner in conversation, who in some important ways is different from us.
Yet seen from this perspective the argument has some rather unusual features: in particular, the presence of an impersonal interlocutor ("the many") and the absence of the crisp and explicit argumentation that is typical of Socratic elenchus.