intangible assets


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Intangible Asset

In accounting, any asset that cannot be seen or touched. Intangible assets include things like patents and brand recognition, which add value to a company, but are difficult to price. Intangible assets explicitly do not include actual things, such as widgets, a widget factory, or the land upon which the widget factory is built. Because of the difficulty in pricing, intangible assets are sometimes not included in a company's valuation. However, not including them may not express the company's true value. See also: Tangible assets.

intangible assets

nonphysical assets such as GOODWILL, PATENTS and TRADEMARKS which have a money value. Compare TANGIBLE ASSETS.
References in periodicals archive ?
Intangible assets related to customer: represent the knowledge of customers or suppliers, called property based on contracts; this category includes supply contracts, advertising, licensing agreements but also customer contracts.
Even if this type of estimation implies errors, it is an indicator which determines satisfactorily the market value of the intangible assets.
The ASC Master Glossary simply defines intangible assets as assets (other than goodwill) that lack physical substance, whereas assets are defined as probable future economic benefits obtained as a result of past transactions (Concept Statement 6).
As defined by the International Accounting Standards (IAS), "An intangible asset is an identifiable non-monetary asset without physical substance.
Remember it is not goodwill you should be striving for; it is the identifiable intangible assets which a purchaser wants.
Whether your enterprise is public, private or non-profit, much of its value consists of intangible assets.
The conditions of knowledge-based economy have led to increase of attention to intangible assets (e.
GE owns thousands of patents, but just because its market value drooped over the last year doesn't mean its intangible assets have slipped to the same degree--or at all.
We have to be able to legally protect intangible assets.
In response to the recent market turmoil, further regulatory regimens and additional investor interest in the intangible assets, their corporate stewardship, and their value should be reasonably expected.