insider


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Insider

A person who has knowledge of or access to restricted or otherwise nonpublic information about a publicly-traded company. Examples include senior management and shareholders with more than a 10% stake in the company. Under most circumstances, it is a crime for an insider to make trades on the special information he/she possesses. See also: Inside information, Insider trading.

insider

1. A person who, because of his or her position within a firm, has access to proprietary information unavailable to the general public. Although the term obviously includes corporate officers, it also may extend to relatives of these officers or to employees of other firms having a special relationship with the firm in question.
2. Officially, an officer, a director, or the owner of 10% or more of a firm's securities. See also Form 3.
References in periodicals archive ?
Panel A of Exhibit 7 shows cumulative abnormal returns over event windows around earnings announcement dates for pre-announcement insider buy and sell positions.
The Harm From Insider Trading and Informed Speculation.
Insider is an extension of what we have long done at Inc.
Develop, implement, manage or support an ITP per National insider Threat Policy requirements.
com/insider-trading/company/agco+corp+de/880266/purchases/) Research insider purchases at AGCO over time .
Ordinary traders will balk at the risk of trading against insiders, and insider trading, then, will undermine confidence in securities markets and deter investment, increasing the price a firm must pay to raise capital and hindering both a firm's development and a society's economic growth more generally, according to the argument from harm.
This restriction can create a tax burden, should the stock decline significantly in value by the time the insider is allowed to dispose of the shares.
Martha Stewart had no fiduciary obligation to anyone, and no one had ever been charged before with insider trading because his broker tipped him to another customer's sales.
If the Insiders succeed, their already-developing global government would become the most powerful force on Earth.
To decide whether insider trading has taken place, the courts and the SEC apply three sets of rules: traditional, misappropriation and tender-offer rules (see "Insider Trading Risk in Practice" page 50).
An insider would have a harder--although not impossible--time curbing Mossback because of the history between himself, Mossback and Mossback's protectors.