insider


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Insider

A person who has knowledge of or access to restricted or otherwise nonpublic information about a publicly-traded company. Examples include senior management and shareholders with more than a 10% stake in the company. Under most circumstances, it is a crime for an insider to make trades on the special information he/she possesses. See also: Inside information, Insider trading.

insider

1. A person who, because of his or her position within a firm, has access to proprietary information unavailable to the general public. Although the term obviously includes corporate officers, it also may extend to relatives of these officers or to employees of other firms having a special relationship with the firm in question.
2. Officially, an officer, a director, or the owner of 10% or more of a firm's securities. See also Form 3.
References in periodicals archive ?
Identify Insider Threat risks, vulnerabilities and weaknesses within an organization.
Use risk mitigation strategies and actionable steps that can be taken to detect, deter and mitigate Insider Threats within an organization.
To be sure, larger firms tend to have a lower percentage of insider ownership.
Not surprisingly, insiders use their control of the firm to engage in indirect insider trading.
com/insider-trading/company/agco+corp+de/880266/purchases/) Research insider purchases at AGCO over time .
Ordinary traders will balk at the risk of trading against insiders, and insider trading, then, will undermine confidence in securities markets and deter investment, increasing the price a firm must pay to raise capital and hindering both a firm's development and a society's economic growth more generally, according to the argument from harm.
Whether we agree with Manne's arguments that insider trading ought to be deregulated for efficiency considerations, there is no doubt that his arguments are at the origin of the prolific debate that followed among lawyers, economists, financiers, and policy-makers.
First, the lock-up agreements and insider trading compliance programs did not provide that E's rights were subject to a substantial risk of forfeiture.
Most insider trading decisions are motivated either by a desire to diversify executives' portfolios away from the firm, or by a general assessment of whether the firm appears undervalued or overvalued relative to its ability to generate earnings.
Martha Stewart had no fiduciary obligation to anyone, and no one had ever been charged before with insider trading because his broker tipped him to another customer's sales.
Yes, the Insiders possess immense power and wealth.
In general, insider trading occurs when a person has "material, nonpublic information" about a security or its issuer and buys or sells that security.