copyright

(redirected from infringer)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

Copyright

The right to distribute, copy, or change an original work for a limited period of time. A state grants copyright to the creator of the work, but the creator may assign or sell the right. During the time the copyright persists, one must (with some exceptions) receive permission from the owner to publish or distribute the copyrighted material. After a certain period of time, any person may distribute the work without permission. See also: Public domain.

copyright

the legal ownership by persons or businesses of certain kinds of material, in particular original literary, dramatic, musical and artistic work; sound recordings, films, broadcasts and cable programmes; the typographical arrangement or layout of a published edition; and computer programs. In the UK, the COPYRIGHT, DESIGNS AND PATENTS ACT 1988 gives legal rights to the creators of copyright material so that they can control the various ways in which their work may be exploited. Copyright protection is automatic and there is no registration or other formality The 1988 Act gives copyright owners protection against unauthorized copying of such material in most cases for a period of 50 years. If copyright is infringed, the copyright owner (or assignee or licensee) may seek an injunction through the courts preventing further abuses, with offenders liable to pay unlimited damages/ fines and prison sentences in extreme cases. See BRAND.

copyright

the ownership of the rights to a publication of a book, manual, newspaper, etc., giving legal entitlement and powers of redress against theft and unauthorized publication or copying. See INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHT.

Copyright

The exclusive legal right to sell, reproduce, or publish a literary, musical, or artistic work.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most of the time, patent owners or alleged infringers have some time to meet with counsel to discuss how to prep for the suit--or perhaps avoid it altogether.
erase any incentive that the infringer has to infringe.
Should the infringer agree to a settlement, the amount will likely be computed along the same lines - what would the royalty have been had the infringer licensed the patent?
21) However, where the infringer is selling in a different market than the copyright owner or where the infringer's sales are not a result of a diversion of customers or sales from the copyright owner, then it is appropriate to assess both actual damages, as well as disgorgement damages.
However, due to the broad drafting of the legislation and the severe consequences for the trade mark owner, it is generally thought that section 21 is used as a weapon by trade mark infringers to intimidate potential litigants.
The licensees may benefit indirectly when the infringer is brought into compliance.
For example, a potential patent infringer may be adequately
In order for an ISP to comply with the basic provisions of the DMCA and thereby avail itself of the DMCA safe harbors, an ISP must 1) adopt and reasonably implement a repeat infringer termination policy, 2) accommodate and not interfere with standard technical measures used by copyright owners to protect copyrighted works, and 3) comply with the DMCA's "notice and take-down" provisions.
Likewise, the copyright owner can learn the identity of the alleged infringer without litigation.
The ContentX platform is the only large-scale, automated system built on an elastic and highly scalable cloud computing infrastructure, which identifies infringers by the thousands, sends notices of their illegal use, and then offers a proven system to collect payments or sign up infringers to fee-based services on behalf of the content owners, at no cost to studios or copyright holders.
Stone, for his part, contends that there is nothing wrong, or even particularly unusual, about his clients identifying the infringers and then trying to settle with them without extensive litigation.
Armed with the letter, the accused infringer may, in good faith, continue making and selling his or her product.