immaterial

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Immaterial

Describing any circumstance or outcome of little to no importance. For example, a price movement in a stock of a single penny one way or another is almost always immaterial to the company's continued operations.

immaterial

Of so little importance or relevance as to have no significant impact on an outcome. For example, a firm may be engaged in a lawsuit involving such an insignificant amount of money that the lawsuit's outcome will not appreciably affect the firm. Thus, the lawsuit and its potential results are immaterial to the preparation of the firm's financial statements. Compare material.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Primero en The Dialectic of Immaterialism, London, Hodder, 1963, y luego en la reedicion de Berkeley and Malebranche en 1967.
By attributing the continuity of nature and its very existence to God, who enables finite spirits to have the ideas that for them constitute the things of this world, Berkeley builds his case for immaterialism as opposed to materialism.
McCulloch's leading thought is that "vanishingly little is settled when immaterialism is rejected" (p.
17) This philosophy of immaterialism, which treats matter (the external objective reality) as spirit (mental perception), approached from the other end provides Hazlitt with a rationale whereby spirit (the forms of the imagination) assumes a material character.
Berman appreciates, more than many Berkeley scholars, the motivating force that skepticism had for Berkeley's immaterialism.
But, Crittenden argues, nothing remarkable follows from that, certainly not immaterialism about conscious states, for in a context, "[g]iven an understanding of the background situation and the absence of complicating factors, we simply grasp" that the subject is in such-and-such a conscious state.
In sections on Berkeley's philosophy, the golden age of Irish philosophy, and New Berkeley letters and Berkeliana, he discusses such topics as missing the wrong target, the culmination and causation of Irish philosophy, and an early essay concerning his immaterialism.
His view rests on a number of central 'contentions' following from Kant's supposed ideality with respect to the form of representation as distinguished from Berkeley's ideality with respect to matter, in short the latter's immaterialism.