hypothesis

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Related to hypotheses: null hypotheses

hypothesis

a prediction derived from theoretical analysis that is couched in a form precise enough to be subjected to testing against empirical data. In economics, hypotheses are generated by a process of logical deduction from sets of initial assumptions about the behaviour of consumers, producers, etc., and are generally tested by collecting economic data and using statistical techniques to analyse them. This testing can lead to modification of the economic theory in the light of the new economic data or to abandonment of that theory in favour of an alternative theory that better explains the facts. See HYPOTHESIS TESTING.
References in periodicals archive ?
The problem of interpreting the results of N multiple simultaneous hypothesis tests is further complicated by the fact that the fraction of true null hypotheses [N.
For example, in a study by Pritts and Hiller (2014) on implementation of physician-nurse patient rounding on a medical unit, the hypotheses appeared in a separate section of the article.
To test the abovementioned hypotheses some questions were designed in the form of a questionnaire.
The Bayesian approach starts with stating the hypotheses (or states) to be compared and the prior probabilities of each.
Statistical linear multiple regression method is utilized to test the hypotheses and specifies Model 1 and Model 2.
Bayes' theorem can be expressed in terms of the odds-ratios between two hypotheses (1):
I have not as yet been able to discover the reason for these properties of gravity from phenomena, and I do not frame hypotheses.
provide useful information but non-informative hypotheses do not.
Among all these processes that are related to scientific inquiry, a critical component is the formulation of hypotheses and testing them using investigations (Lawson, 2002).
Participants were least accurate in identifying the functional hypotheses for Aaron, Helen, Barbara, and Manuel's problem behavior (67% or less) and most accurate with Danielle and Adam (87%).
There are usually two kinds of hypotheses used in internal investigations: working hypotheses and final hypotheses.
The problems with multiple hypotheses are well known and often addressed in textbooks on research methods under the topics of joint tests (e.