aging

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Aging

The process of investigating a company's accounts receivable according to how long individual invoices have been outstanding. Analysts can use aging to identify bad debt and/or problems with the company's credit policy.

aging

A technique for evaluating the composition of a firm's accounts receivables to determine whether irregularities exist. It is carried out by grouping a firm's accounts receivables according to the length of time accounts have been outstanding. For example, a financial analyst may use aging to determine whether a firm carries many overdue debtors that may never pay their bills.
References in periodicals archive ?
In recent years, our understanding of treatment-resistant hypertension has increased and new therapeutic approaches are providing the potential to improve patient outcomes.
He said there needed to be continuous education in the field of hypertension to help physicians keep up to date with the latest developments and innovations.
Meta-analysis of prevalence of hypertension in India.
Future research in this area should go beyond identifying secondary hypertension from drugs and toxins to determining their dose-time susceptibility characteristics and the magnitude and strength of this association.
Those with persistent hypertension were referred to cardiovascular physicians for follow-up of more than 1 year, during which none of the final diagnoses changed.
Pulmonary hypertension is an important factor in determining post-operative morbidity and mortality in children with congenital heart disease.
Women who had used antihypertensive drugs before pregnancy and those who had multiple births, preexisting chronic hypertension, diabetes, gestational diabetes, cardiovascular disease or chronic renal disease were excluded, because these characteristics are associated with both preeclampsia or gestational hypertension and birth weight.
Tracleer, the first pill for treatment of pulmonary hypertension, has been approved by the U.
Almost one quarter of adults in the United States have hypertension.
Among the negative health effects of lead absorption are demonstrated increases in blood pressure and the risk of developing chronic high blood pressure, or hypertension.
Hypertension is twice as common in blacks as whites, and severe hypertension is rive times more common in black men and seven times more common in black women compared with whites.
For example, a study reported last March in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that some 80-to-84-year-old hypertension patients reduced their blood pressure through monitored sodium restriction and weight loss.