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H

Fifth letter of a Nasdaq stock symbol specifying that the issue is the second preferred bond of the company.

H

Used in stock transaction tables in newspapers to indicate that during the day's activity the stock traded at a new 52-week high price.
References in periodicals archive ?
Creating a network of filling stations is one of the biggest obstacles to a hydrogen crossover, and mobile stations may have to provide an initial solution.
When the researchers heated a solution of the compound to a little over 100[degrees]C, it released two of its hydrogen atoms as hydrogen gas.
A longtime clean-air advocate, Campbell pushed Burbank to take advantage of grants and become one of the first cities to install a hydrogen fueling station for city vehicles - one that eventually will be open to the public.
While atmospheric humidity may be the major source of hydrogen, moisture can come from many other sources, such as metal processing tools, improperly dried and cured crucibles and refractory, charge materials and furnace combustion products.
Assuming the costs of fuel were lower, someone would need to create a hydrogen distribution infrastructure, and that still wouldn't address the fact that fuel cell performance currently pales in comparison to that of the internal combustion engine.
Most commercially produced hydrogen is used for manufacturing ammonia and methanol and for hydrogenating fats and oils (this makes liquid oils semisolid, makes them less likely to become rancid, and improves the appearance of fats).
Hydrogen is a natural byproduct of fuel combustion, but a portion is trapped in the form of hydrocarbons on the cylinder wall.
Hawaii and Vanuatu are following the lead of yet another island, Iceland, which amazed the world in 1999 when it announced its intention to become the world's first hydrogen society.
For example, this affinity increased carbon dioxide's permeability relative to hydrogen but wasn't so strong that it impeded the contaminant's movement through the membrane, says Freeman.
You'd just go to the hydrogen filling station or maybe even one day do it at home.
As Hoffman writes in his book, Tomorrow's Energy: Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and the Prospects for a Cleaner Planet (MIT Press), hydrogen can "propel airplanes, cars, trains and ships, run plants, and heat homes, offices, hospitals and schools.