Hybrid

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Hybrid

A package of two or more different kinds of risk management instruments that are usually interactive.
References in periodicals archive ?
These various documents offered elements of definition of hybridity, yet no generic definition has emerged.
Moving beyond the confines of a contemporary hybridization perspective, we selectively draw on postcolonial theory and advocate for a historical hybridity perspective as a heuristic device to understand Indian management and its globalization related transition.
For a helpful discussion of hybridity, see Bill Ashcroft, Gareth Griffiths, and Helen Tiffin, 2000, Post-Colonial Studies: The Key Concepts, London: Routledge, pp.
From this notion of culture Sweetness in the Belly derives its complexity and its focus on alterity and hybridity.
In contrast, in La Reunion, cultural hybridity was promoted as a way in which the white race would assimilate all the positive qualities of the other races to make the white Creole (born in the colony) population superior to various immigrants.
Readers of JFA might not find much of relevance to their work here; however, if they belong to that substantial minority who are closet or not-so-closet medievalists, they will find Hybridity, Identity and Monstrosity in Medieval Britain: On Difficult Middles a challenging and suggestive study.
He expends so much energy refuting other critics that the reader becomes distracted by that and the author's recourse to the fixed set of talking points regarding hybridity and subversion found in each successive chapter Canadas's discussion of "theatrical transvestism," for example, contains all the reflexes of what he associates with queer, cultural, and gender-inflected historicism but makes no new observation, breaks no new ground in either English or Hispanic studies.
Hybridity is a notion associated with post-colonial work, such as Homi Bhabha's, one of many theorists to whom Grobman cites her indebtedness.
She clearly states her goals in the introduction, indicating that she will analyze the four texts with mainly three questions in mind: how hybridity relates to identity and women's writing; how these writers overcame and at times embraced their marginality; and how writing promotes empowerment, particularly when employed in the redefinition of selfhood.
In her article, "Hybridity as a Strategy for Self-Determination in Contemporary American Indian Art," Cynthia Fowler examines the ways in which a key group of American Indian artists have explored the postcolonial concept of hybridity in their work as a vehicle for the redefinition of themselves as individuals and their culture as a whole.
The text itself, which Chamay aptly describes as a "satirico-culinary allegory" that exploits the topos of the mundus inversus (xxxv), is a visual reminder of hybridity due to marginal glosses in French and Latin to the left and the right of the main text.
Part 4, "Introduction: Theatre and Performance in the Age of Global Communications, 1950-present," includes "Colonialism, Globalization, Media, and Theatre" (407-24); "Rich and Poor Theatres of Globalization" (425-49); "Director, Text, and Performances in the Postmodern World" (450-84); and "Interculturalism, Hybridity, Tourism: The Performing World on New Terms" (485-19).