Hybrid

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Hybrid

A package of two or more different kinds of risk management instruments that are usually interactive.
References in periodicals archive ?
11), which refers to the 'mystery' of Darwin supplying Mendel's name for inclusion in the hybridism entry for Encyclopaedia Britannica.
In a dialogue with readers, they present arguments, examine contradictions, interpret conflicts and paradoxes, acknowledge obvious hybridism, and accept the complexity and difficulty of studying contemporary eduction policies.
From this singular managerial guideline that has been established in industrialized Brazil, we highlight two points that mark the hybridism between rural heritage and the typical rationalization of the work of modern organizations: (a) opting for protectionism based on political influence and privileges extended to the businessman, which characterize relationships among the economic elite in Brazil; and (b) the subordination of formal authority and technical competence of the professional manager to patriarchal personalist logic, which favors family ties and personal loyalty.
are in use and interactions are approached from intertextual perspectives, postcolonial hybridism, or from the point of narratological, cognitive, (comparative) cultural, or media studies.
I will demonstrate that this generic hybridism constitutes the visual vocabulary of Giger's critique of the discourse of sexuality and sexual reproduction in the 1960s and 1970s.
The British-based Caribbean poet, John Figueroa, sees no signs that hybridism is widely accepted in Europe.
Emphasising attributes like syncretism, hybridism, disruption, and polyglossia in postcolonial texts, they see postcolonialism as a potentially subversive presence within the colonial itself.
Nyman, of the Academy of Finland, looks at several post-colonial writers from Britain and America through the concepts of hybridism and mobility.
The proper attitude is perhaps to acknowledge the major conceptualizations on the issue as represented by Chinua Achebe's hybridism and wa Thiong'o Ngugi's essentialism as different language aesthetic approaches that have influenced present practices of creative writing in Africa, and from that perspective to study concurrently the writings in both European and African languages.
The solution that Moffett suggests in part three, "Arranging to Know," to relieve the conformity versus hybridism debate within the academic sphere, as well as to erase the arbitrary imposition of subject fields, is a fusion of all subjects--"harmonic learning," an approach that takes current popular ideas of interdisciplinary studies to their holistic logical extreme.