Hubris

(redirected from hubristically)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

Hubris

An arrogance due to excessive pride and an insolence toward others. A classic character flaw of a trader or investor.
References in periodicals archive ?
But, amazingly, it was a flagrant partisanship that he opted for arrogantly and hubristically to administer his civil strife-torn country.
266) The theory's name was tongue-incheek, as its gist was that financial turmoil occurs when market actors hubristically assume that "financial crises are things that happen to other people in other countries at other times.
To take Dawkins and Geller as examples, one can therefore argue that either they have failed to realise the existential implications of their commitments, or that they have hubristically supposed that they can cope with them, when, in fact, they cannot.
perhaps hubristically, that their impact as amici may be
The section on Milton is memorable, especially for its defense of Milton against the charge that he hubristically over-reached his theological brief by attempting to supplement Scripture with his own poetry.
I'd prefer regulation to try to prevent behaviors that may lead to bubbles rather than leave it up to central bankers to hubristically decide when the bubble exists, how much is enough to pop it, and whether they have the guts to do it.
Before targeting the national culture and language of France (or Brazil, or South Korea, or any other national identity for that matter), we should first concentrate on retreating from the familiarity of national culture in which we are immersed and one that hubristically embraces certainty.
But hubristically, Clr Khan would like us to think otherwise.
A parallel relationship between the two men is even more strongly suggested as each man hubristically puts his treasured possession at risk, the driver by not backing up and taking an alternate route and Sal by stubbornly refusing to relocate, a decision repeatedly questioned throughout the film.
Medical providers should "hold firm (but not hubristically or dogmatically so) to their conceptions of their patients' good, while recognizing that in many cases their confidence in what is best is not rooted in their medical expertise.