Point

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Point

The smallest unit of price change quoted, or one one-hundredth of a percent. Related: Minimum price fluctuation and tick.

Point

A way of conceptualizing price changes in the trading of securities. For stocks, a point corresponds to $1, while for bonds it indicates a 1% change relative to the face value. For example, if one states that GE rose two points on Thursday, this means that it rose $2. See also: Tick.

point

A change in the value of a security or a security index or average. For common and preferred stocks a point represents a change of $1. For bonds a point represents a 1% change in face value. For example, a one-point decline in a $1,000 principal amount bond translates to a $10 decline in price. For stock averages and indexes a point represents a unit of movement and is best interpreted as a percent of the beginning value. For example, a 100-point decline in the Dow Jones Industrial Average that started the day at 10,000 represents a 1% fall in the average.
References in periodicals archive ?
Using the same animal or person, students create an articulated structure in computer animation by creating and aligning the structures, moving the hot points, linking the structures, adding link properties, and adding the behavior.
Approximately 1 mile to the east of the Long Claims is the 62-claim RC claim-block, which hosts two prospective areas of uranium mineralization as well as the as-yet un-quantified Hot Point ore body.
She was named Manager Hot Point, RCA and Monogram brands in 1991 and Product Manager for Dishwasher Products in 1994.
WCD lists eight areas in particular that have emerged as hot points of discussion during the group's 2014 Institutes and events, setting the agenda for the upcoming Asia Institute September 3-4 in Singapore, as well as the Americas Institute November 11-12 in Miami:
The RHEESI data revealed two extremely hot points above and below the reconnection point of the two magnetic fields, a known sign of magnetic reconnection, reports NASA.
According to the study, mealtimes, mornings, shopping and housework create the biggest tension hot points.
For us, it's more about how we can educate the customers to use the technology and what are their hot points," says Noble.