homestead

(redirected from homesteading)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

homestead

The dwelling house and adjoining land forming the permanent residence of the head of household.Under modern law,a person's homestead is given a very specific definition within each state's statutes and is then granted protections from creditors and against excessive real estate taxes. The term homestead may also apply to the rights granted to a widow or widower to use real property for their remaining lives if they elect to take advantage of homestead laws rather than provisions made in a will.The protections may be unlimited, only up to a certain dollar value of equity, or limited in area. Each state's laws are different, and homestead may be defined differently in the various statutes within a state.

References in periodicals archive ?
Both of these colonies focused on homesteading, agricultural improvement, and self-government.
The depiction of the lone black homesteader drives Micheaux's three autobiographical novels set in South Dakota: The Conquest (1913), The Homesteader (1917), and The Wind from Nowhere (1941), the first two written during Micheaux's homesteading years there.
The Conquest closes with Devereaux's wife's decision to stay with her father in Chicago, thus rejecting her husband's homesteading ideals.
But what should we make of Micheaux's almost obsessive need to tell his homesteading story again and again?
Wyeth is a black farmer from South Dakota who sells his autobiographical novel about homesteading door-to-door in the South.
By the time Micheaux lauded the golden opportunities of the Great Plains in The Forged Note, he had already given up homesteading.
The last retelling of Micheaux's homesteading narrative comes as his last film, The Betrayal, a production of his novel The Wind From Nowhere (1941).