homestead

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homestead

The dwelling house and adjoining land forming the permanent residence of the head of household.Under modern law,a person's homestead is given a very specific definition within each state's statutes and is then granted protections from creditors and against excessive real estate taxes. The term homestead may also apply to the rights granted to a widow or widower to use real property for their remaining lives if they elect to take advantage of homestead laws rather than provisions made in a will.The protections may be unlimited, only up to a certain dollar value of equity, or limited in area. Each state's laws are different, and homestead may be defined differently in the various statutes within a state.

References in periodicals archive ?
Though Micheaux consistently presented himself, and his central characters, as a lone black man homesteading on the wilderness of the frontier plains, a look at the historical situations of his--and other African Americans'--settling helps to contextualize both his fictions and his ideals.
9) Micheaux remained in South Dakota, farming and growing his landholdings until 1918 when, after over a decade of homesteading, including two years of drought, three self-published novels, and a broken marriage, Micheaux turned his attention to film making and left South Dakota, apparently never to return.
As a booster, though, Micheaux urges African Americans to follow in his footsteps and take up homesteading.
Though Micheaux was quite possibly one of the only African Americans attempting to acquire an allotment from the Rosebud Sioux Reservation, African-American homesteading in the West was by no means a rarity.
In the late 1880s, parts of present-day Oklahoma, then entitled the Unassigned Lands (as the Sac, Fox, Apache, and other tribes had been relocated west to the Oklahoma Territory), opened to homesteading with the famous "land run" in April of 1889.
Families who want to return to the land, whose vision for homesteading starts with bare ground, must first face the prospects of finding a place that is affordable.
Many practices that you perhaps assume to be a necessary part of homesteading might be restricted or prohibited by private covenants or government zoning and permits.
In 11 years of helping people with homesteading and building projects of many kinds, I have come across a few people who started and continued the process correctly.
Over the years I have found the following chronological plan to be useful in most homesteading endeavors.
I know this is somewhat contrary to the "American dream," but then so are a lot of aspects of modern homesteading.
To me homesteading is both a state of mind and a state of physical reality.
In that regard, it covers the most basic of the basics: how to think about homesteading.