Homeowner

(redirected from homeownership)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to homeownership: homeownership rate

Homeowner

A person who owns his/her primary residence. Homeownership gives the owner a stake in his/her neighborhood or town's long-term stability, as we as a significant investment. The U.S. federal government thus attempts to encourage homeownership by allowing owners to deduct the interest on their mortgages from their taxable income.
References in periodicals archive ?
The foreclosure crisis, and the bubble that preceded it, focused attention on the cost of homes, but it's time to turn our attention back where it belongs: on the benefits homeownership adds to individuals and communities,” said Julie Gugin, executive director of the Minnesota Homeownership Center.
I do think it is a legitimate question to ask whether homeownership remains a valid policy goal, but I also believe that homeownership, per se, was never a valid goal.
Census Bureau, Florida's homeownership rate in 2006 and 2005 was 72.
When compared with the fourth quarter of 2005, the homeownership rates for each region were not statistically different from their respective rates the previous year, according to the Census Bureau.
Broadening the current credit spectrum to be more inclusive of culturally influenced Hispanic borrower traits is what the industry must begin to do in order to continue to close the Hispanic homeownership gap.
California has not been on a par with the nation in regard to homeownership since the 1960s, Nevin's analysis showed.
And with homeownership being the foundation upon which most of the nation's personal wealth is built, it made perfect sense for us to demonstrate our commitment financially, as well.
Public policy concern has been especially great over the large and, until recently, growing gap between white and black homeownership rates.
The national homeownership rate remained remarkably stable for the fifty years ending with World War II.
HomeStreet Bank also partners with select local realtors who contribute a portion of their commission towards the buyer's closing costs and assist with homeownership education.
Realtors build communities and we are carrying out the nation's housing mission -- helping to elevate homeownership to more than 69 percent of U.
In 2003, the last year for which such data are available, the homeownership rate for working families (defined for this purpose as households with incomes between full-time minimum wage work and 120 percent of the area median) was 57.

Full browser ?