holiday effect

Holiday Effect

The tendency for a stock market to gain on the final trading day before an exchange-mandated long weekend or holiday such as Labor Day or Christmas. The holiday effect can be beneficial for traders, who may buy a security in the days leading up to the last trading day and then sell for a higher price on the final day. See also: Calendar effects.

holiday effect

The unusually good performance by stocks on the day prior to market-closing holidays.
References in periodicals archive ?
5 percent on-month in February after sliding 2 percent in January, but the February rebound was attributed to temporary factors, including the Lunar New Year's holiday effect, the low base effect and rising inventory among manufacturers.
Because of the public holiday effect, aircraft movements at FRA dropped by 2.
Vicky Redwood, chief UK economist at Capital Economics, said: "The economy should rebound in the third quarter as the bank holiday effect unwinds and any Olympics boost comes through.
She added: "GDP should rebound in the third quarter as the bank holiday effect unwinds and any boost to the Olympics comes through.
But Al Loughani, Al Saad, and Ali (2005) do not report the presence of any holiday effect for Kuwait, nor does Al-Khazali (2008) find a day-of-the-week effect for the United Arab Emirates stock markets.
With this I measure the impact of the three explanatory variables--weekend effect, holiday effect and official holiday effect--on total daily hospital admissions.
With the bank holiday effect stripped out, BAA said the underlying decline remained stable at about 6.
This study investigates the day of the week effect, the turn of the year effect, the holiday effect, and the previous day price change effect for the period 1970 through 1995.
The day-of-the week effect, first documented by Osborne (1962); the weekend effect (significantly lower returns over the period between Friday's close and Monday's close), first documented by French (1980); the January effect (relatively higher returns in January), first reported by Wachtel (1942); the trading month effect studied by Ariel (1987); and the holiday effect documented by Lakonishok and Smidt (1988), are among the most important calendar effects.
You'll remember we reported a pyschologist's assertion that January 24 is the most miserable day of the year because of bad weather, debt from festive overspending, the holiday effect wearing off and guilt over broken New Year resolutions.
Another favorite is to put floating candles in a glass jar filled with colored water (add a few drops of red or green food coloring) for a great holiday effect.
It's called the holiday effect and it's about a lot more than acquiring a light tan and having the opportunity to flash the flesh on the beach.