hit

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Hit

A unit measuring a person or IP address visiting a website. In general, the more hits a website generates, the higher revenue it earns from advertising and other sources.

hit

1. To sell a security at a bid price quoted by a dealer. For example, a trader will hit a bid.
2. To lose money on a trade. For example, a dealer may take a hit on the holdings of Moore's Fried Foods' common stock.
References in classic literature ?
Had Martin not talked as he had to his wife he would have been able, undoubtedly, to disregard her and to continue the line of chatter which he had hit upon so happily and which he had never suspected was in him.
Tarzan required assistance in the scheme he had hit upon and his assistant must be equally as brave and almost as active as he.
At last they con- spired together and hit upon a plan that promised a dazzling victory.
He can sit down and write a fine flourishing letter, full of professions and falsehoods, and persuade himself that he has hit upon the very best method in the world of preserving peace at home and preventing his father's having any right to complain.
I was determined, however, to explore the low structure which was the only evidence of habitation in sight, and so I hit upon the unique plan of reverting to first principles in locomotion, creeping.
The grave was being dug slowly; the fish fled on all sides while their retreat was being thus disturbed; I heard the strokes of the pickaxe, which sparkled when it hit upon some flint lost at the bottom of the waters.
I am glad I was lucky enough to hit upon the right thing.
It is evident, then, that those who employ slaves have not as yet hit upon the right way of managing them.
One day a good fortune befell him, for he hit upon Lane's translation of The Thousand Nights and a Night.
However, as one plan after another was conjured by the strength of his desires, he at last hit upon one which came to him almost with the force of a blow and brought him sitting upright among his sleeping companions.
At last he hit upon a plan, and after seeing that he was concealed from the view of those below, he gave a few hoarse grunts in imitation of a panther.
I was interested as to which quatrain he would like best, and was not surprised when he hit upon the one born of an instant's irritability, and quite at variance with the Persian's complacent philosophy and genial code of life: