hire

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Hire

To initiate employment for a person. That is, one hires an employee when one asks him/her to accept a job and he/she agrees. The employer agrees to pay wages and/or salary to the employee, who agrees to perform certain services for the employer. See also: Fire.

hire

the use by individuals or businesses of an ASSET that is leased to them by the owner of the asset in return for a financial payment (the hire charge). Hiring provides a means for consumers or firms to make use of assets without having to make large cash payments to purchase them. See LEASING.
References in periodicals archive ?
This hiring workshop provides concrete tools for business owners to grow their business though effective hiring, to eliminate recruiting actions that waste a business owner's time and to alleviate the fear and dread that comes with hiring.
Councilman Dennis Zine, a retired police sergeant, had joined Councilman and former Police Chief Bernard Parks in challenging the hiring standard.
The key fact about working with recruiters and agencies is to remember that they work for the hiring company, not you.
Using online applications and a more streamlined hiring process is an important first step toward moving away from a very antiquated process that's now in place.
In reading Jonathan Martin's Divided Mastery: Slave Hiring in the American South, I was reminded of Albert O.
In hiring inspectors from one of three Washington-area firms, FEMA is required by law to subject applicants to a rigorous background check.
The cost of hiring an additional anesthesiologist is $200,000.
30, 2003, Edwards had hired 23 engineers, and that number would have been much larger if not for the changing mission objectives related to Operation Iraqi Freedom, which delayed personnel hiring decisions.
It may also explain why firms are not hiring as many students with advanced degrees as they would like.
Hiring, full salary: 2 women, 3 men; apprentices: 2 women, 3 men.
Because only about 24 percent of applicants succeed in gaining employment, the division estimated that this hiring goal would require processing more than 1,400 applications.