hereditament


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Related to hereditament: Incorporeal hereditament, appurtenance

hereditament

Any real or personal property that may be inherited. It would not include a life estate in oneself—meaning a right to land during one's own life but no longer—because that obviously can't be inherited.The word had more importance under older English law because of the ability to place a greater variety of restrictions on land than is possible today.It is often encountered in wills, leaving “all my lands, tenements and hereditaments to my daughter… .“ As a practical matter,only the word “hereditament”is necessary because it includes the other two.

References in periodicals archive ?
87) The Cecils were successively Masters of the Court of Wards and Liveries and their job was to "survey and dispose of all and every of our Wards, Idiots, and Lunatiques, and respectively, of their Lands, Tenements, Hereditaments, Chattels, goods, properties, interests, rights, titles, Intrusions, Arrearages and Mean-rates, and all Liveries, Ouster le maines, and ancient Mannors, and all Advowsons, and presentations of Churches, Herriots, Reliefes, Coppyholds, Woods, Mines, and Quarries, of any of our Wards, and of all duties belonging, or to belong to us by reason of any Tenure": Ley, A5r.
corporeal hereditaments, to the [detriment of the one
The grant of lands to the school totaled about 125 acres and included "all those fields, meadows and pastures, and hereditaments, whatsoever with the appurtenances, called or known by the name or names of Long-Croft, Byn-ges, Rotton-fields, Wal-mores, and St Mary Wood lying and being in the Foreign of Birmingham".
incorporeal hereditaments to be things despite awareness that
The grant of lands to the school included 'all those fields, meadows and pastures, and hereditaments, whatsover with the appurtenances, called or known by the name or names of Long-Croft, Bynges, Rotton-fields, Walmores, and Saint Mary Wood lying and being in the Foreign of Birmingham'.
He opened with the crushingly arcane subject of "hereditaments,"(30) and indeed with "incorporeal hereditaments," themselves subdivided into the "ten sorts" of "advowsons, tithes, commons, ways, offices, dignities, franchises, corodies or pensions, annuities, and rents.
corporeal hereditaments like coal and other hard-rock minerals, or