position

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Position

A market commitment; the number of contracts bought or sold for which no offsetting transaction has been entered into. The buyer of a commodity is said to have a long position, and the seller of a commodity is said to have a short position. Related: Open contracts.

Position

The state of owning or owing a security or other asset. One has a long position when one owns something, while one has a short position when something is sold, especially sold short. See also: Close a position.

position

The ownership status of a person's or an institution's investments. For example, a person may own 500 shares of Sun Microsystems, 350 shares of Boeing, and a $10,000 principal amount of 9% bonds due in 2001. See also long position, short position.

position

To buy or sell securities in order to establish a net long or a net short position. Also called take a position.
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