heir

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Heir

A person entitled to receive property (and, in some jurisdictions, title) from a deceased person. An heir may be designated by custom or statute, or may be selected in the decedent's will.

heir

A person who by will or statutory law receives or is scheduled to receive a portion or all of the assets of an estate.

heir

One who inherits property.

References in periodicals archive ?
This is particularly important in the case of physical property, which can be subject to forced heirship rules that lay down exactly how the property is distributed among family members.
This Regulation aims to bring unity throughout the EU regarding the distribution of property and overriding the forced heirship rules for people habitually resident in the UK.
See McGOVERN, supra note 20, at 30 (discussing forced heir statutes); Bosques-Hernandez, supra note 17, at 23 (discussing "forced heirship," which does not allow testators to deviate from statutory schemes regarding succession "as a matter of public policy"); Perrin, supra note 1, at 657-59 (discussing the ability of heirs to assert their "forced heirship" rights in inter vivos trusts and testamentary trusts); Wustemann, supra note 1, at 45-46 (comparing forced heirship under U.
5) grant heirship, succession, entitlement, or determine the persons to whom distribution should be made;
Heirship can be proven by providing a variety of documentation and other particulars about the account containing the assets.
portion of the estate plan for citizens of these countries, advisers should consider that some transfers may be restricted or subject to litigation as a result of forced heirship rules.
He also enlightened the participants of rights and legal heirship of eunuchs.
He also enlightened the participants of the rights and legal heirship of eunuchs Pakistani society.
Offshore trusts and offshore foundations are becoming a popular choice for many people wishing to avoid forced heirship rules and inheritance tax in their domicile country.
This division takes place in case if the defunct did not leave a will, but he made donations during his life, this will be verified if that through the donations that he made he did not change the heirship that is appropriate to the heirs who are entitled to a portion of an inheritance.
Donaldson takes a different perspective on fantasy than Tolkien did and provides a better answer" (29), become explicable--if still arguably excessive--in the context of her defending Donaldson's heirship to Tolkien.