heir

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Heir

A person entitled to receive property (and, in some jurisdictions, title) from a deceased person. An heir may be designated by custom or statute, or may be selected in the decedent's will.

heir

A person who by will or statutory law receives or is scheduled to receive a portion or all of the assets of an estate.

heir

One who inherits property.

References in periodicals archive ?
This bill is an expression of concern against the agony of delayed judgments one has to suffer in obtaining even the legitimate right in the heirship.
Other jurisdictions that recognize forced heirship appear to adopt a similar approach.
That is, forced heirship and systems of community marital property serve the same function as the undue influence of restricting excessive impecunious gifts outside the family and protecting the natural recipients of the testator's bounty.
KNOETSCH, 1995, Contextualization and Christianization in Cumberland Sound, Baffin Island (1880s-1920s): Shamans, Lay Readers, and Priests in the Arctic -- Rival Contenders for Heirship to the Throne.
This gives the relevant information on the inevitable for 23 countries, including eligibility, types of tax, rates, trusts, capital gains and capital losses, transfers, filing procedures and circumstances such as forced heirship.
For example, estate taxes which will apply on the death of the individual or the existence of a forced heirship regime in that other jurisdiction may change who receives what assets.
In reaching this result, the appellate court drew the narrow distinction between "actions" to determine paternity and "motions" within a probate proceeding to establish heirship for purposes of intestate succession (29) and held that the limitations period for establishing paternity does not apply to probate proceedings.
48) These exceptions are based on forced heirship philosophy.
Louisiana provides rights to the decedent's property for surviving family members through community property, marital portion, and forced heirship.
DuBray says the real problem is not the government's loss of Indian records or mismanagement of funds or its negligence as trustee but an issue most Indians "don't really understand": the issue of fractionated heirship.
1, 13 (1899) (holding that tribal determination of heirship of non-reservation, non-trust property is binding and cannot be modified by congressional acts).