Headline

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Headline

A brief statement at the beginning of an article, usually in larger type than the rest of the article, that describes what the article will state. Headlines are often abbreviated and may be deliberately sensational, especially in tabloids. A famous example of a headline occurred during the Great Crash in 1929, when Variety magazine reported, "WALL ST. LAYS AN EGG."
References in periodicals archive ?
Interestingly, the headline was not among Musetto's favourite that he wrote for the newspaper.
For example, I won't write a headline on this piece, but I'll dip back into the page later and if night editor John Williams has come up with something which has me scratching my head, I may think about re-writing this column
You can benefit from this research by studying the cover lines, those teasing headlines that flash like neon at passersby.
Norm Goldstein, editor of The Associated Press Stylebook, gives some helpful tips on online headline writing in the current issue of Copy Editor newsletter:
While there is a growing body of research on the accuracy and nature of newspaper stories (9), there is little available data on the accuracy of headlines in the context of genetic research.
That transposed into the ``Redmond threatens Channel 4" headlines.
However, the modus operandi of these various food groups is the subject of many conflicting and confusing headlines.
Load up your grocery cart, your garden, and your plate, and don't be tempted by the claims made by the supplement companies or confused by misleading headlines.
So why don't supermarkets have headlines that people want to read?
Silverman said that although the issue of whether headlines alone could form the basis of a libel action was one of first impression for California courts, headlines are not "liability-free zones" under California law.
The effect is subliminally cathartic, for the headlines tell us about the reversal of our world's fortunes--we ourselves have caused it--and reading them we experience self-recognition.
Similarly, his perk-busting campaign drew minutes of air time on CNN and the networks, as well as headlines like The Houston Chronicle's "Foley Promises Reforms in Houses; Gingrich Rips Dems.