Hawkish

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Hawkish

An aggressive tone. For example, if the Federal Reserve uses hawkish language to describe the threat of inflation, one could reasonably expect stronger actions from the Fed. There is a similar application to CEO describing an important issue that a firm faces. Opposite of Dovish.

Hawkish

Describing a statement from the Federal Reserve indicating that it may raise interest rates. The statement is called hawkish because it indicates that the Fed believes that the inflation rate is high enough to warrant concern. See also: Dovish.
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On the Jewish side, the hawkishness is based on a perception that despite their willingness to compromise and return territories, to a point they would not have considered before 1993, the Palestinians keep reverting to violence to seek more concessions.
These were dark years for antiwar conservatives, when Rudy Giuliani appeared likely to seize the GOP presidential nomination--in spite of his pro-choice stance--on the strength of his hawkishness and 9/11-hero status alone.
The combined effect of Fed hawkishness and Draghi remarks on 'downside risks' in Euroland hit the euro and lifted the dollar.
Their marriages, money, irresponsible hawkishness, Islamophobia and willingness to say almost anything to court favour with their party's hardliners has resulted in a long-running embarrassment.
In early 2011, euro's outperformance continued because of the ECB hawkishness.
Avoiding simple-minded hawkishness on Israel is good politics.
With Americans having just had a Close Encounter of the Third Kind with Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, it's no surprise that her relative hawkishness is only widening her primary lead.
Harold Meyerson wrote in the Washington Post that McCain's continued hawkishness, even if held sincerely, was flawed, writing that "integrity in the pursuit of fantasy is no virtue.
Coughlin's insightful descriptions of the sometimes contentious diplomatic relationship between the two leaders (Blair was always much more willing than Clinton use ground troops against Serbian forces) serve to remind the reader that Blair's hawkishness is not simply a (relatively recent) result of wanting to please Bush.
Said David Brown, chief European economist at Bears Stearns International: "These numbers probably pull the argument away from Mervyn King's implied hawkishness against higher rates back to the doves camp and for the UK easing bias to stay intact,"