Hardship

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Hardship

A financial or personal need that must be addressed. For example, one may make a hardship withdrawal from a retirement account in order to pay for unexpected medical bills one may not be able to afford otherwise. Likewise, one may be able to cancel an employment contract early if a spouse dies and one must take care of one's children.
References in periodicals archive ?
The restoration of the previous practice will save millions of PTCL subscribers from unwanted hardships.
ISLAMABAD -- Minister of State for National Health Services, Regulations and Coordination Saira Afzal Tarar on Tuesday informed the Senate that out of total 612, prices of only 177 medicines were allowed to increase under hardship cases.
Are they going to accept the verdict of the tribunal or are they going to appeal, causing greater hardship and distress for tenants.
111-148, also provides a wide range of other hardships and taxpayer groups and circumstances qualifying for exemption (see "Tax Practice Corner: Calculating the Health Care Individual Mandate Penalty," Jan.
Hardships faced in childhood are often associated with health behaviors later in life, which can include smoking, depression, mood and sleep disturbances, and substance use and abuse, according to background information in the article.
He asserts that it was a true hardship to be posted in Jerusalem.
Discretionary action may be obtained when development of a particular parcel of land would cause owner hardship.
We assert that, for several reasons, the official poverty measure underrepresents the proportion of families experiencing income hardship.
The video ends with a summary of the six scenarios including further discussion of undue hardships to employers and their requirements under law to prevent employee harassment.
But this gives you no idea of the incredible planning, drama and hardship involved in this feat.
Only those with valid medical or financial hardships may be excused.
In 1:3-18) Paul uses many of the consolatory arguments: "the distinction between things that matter and those that do not" (1:9), misfortunes actually advance the things that really matter(1:12-18), "hardship enhances one's reputation" (1:13) and makes one an example for others (1:14), and that one experiences joy in the middle of hardships (1:18).