Habit

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Habit

A normal custom of an individual or group. Habits greatly influence economic behavior at both the micro- and macro- levels. For example, one may develop the habit of only shopping at certain stores, whether or not they have the best products or prices. Likewise, the majority of farmers in a country may only grow certain crops, whether or not those are the best for the land or the market. Habits may be positive or negative, and are often both, depending on one's perspective.
References in classic literature ?
Unless people are more than commonly disagreeable, it is my foolish habit to contract a kindness for them.
There is something servile in the habit of seeking after a law which we may obey.
We did say that habits and dispositions were relative.
My bride looked charmingly in a green silk calash and riding habit of pelisse cloth; and whenever her red lips parted with a smile, each tooth appeared like an inestimable pearl.
Therefore set it down, that an habit of secrecy, is both politic and moral.
He had a habit, Mary remarked, and she had never noticed it so clearly before, of letting his sentences tail away in a continuous murmur, whereupon he passed into a state of abstraction, presumed by his children to indicate some train of thought too profound for utterance.
The short-faced tumbler has a beak in outline almost like that of a finch; and the common tumbler has the singular and strictly inherited habit of flying at a great height in a compact flock, and tumbling in the air head over heels.
Considering the strictly subterranean habits of the tucutuco, the blindness, though so common, cannot be a very serious evil; yet it appears strange that any animal should possess an organ frequently subject to be injured.
And therefore our politic Asclepius may be supposed to have exhibited the power of his art only to persons who, being generally of healthy constitution and habits of life, had a definite ailment; such as these he cured by purges and operations, and bade them live as usual, herein consulting the interests of the State; but bodies which disease had penetrated through and through he would not have attempted to cure by gradual processes of evacuation and infusion: he did not want to lengthen out good-for-nothing lives, or to have weak fathers begetting weaker sons;--if a man was not able to live in the ordinary way he had no business to cure him; for such a cure would have been of no use either to himself, or to the State.
There is no reason--so Watson argues--to suppose that their knowledge IS anything beyond the habits shown in this behaviour: the inference that other people have something nonphysical called "mind" or "thought" is therefore unwarranted.
Listen to his beasts' habits and belly orders," said the old man, delighted with the evident embarrassment of his rival; "and then he says it is not the core
Pontellier had brought down her key through force of habit.