Gutter

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Gutter

1. In newspapers and journalism, the space between columns.

2. In books and magazines, any crease in a page, especially the center margin.
References in classic literature ?
at the end of the tunnel the gutter discharged itself into a great canal; that would be just as dangerous for him as it would be for us to go down a waterfall.
The mud of Paris," he said to himself--for decidedly he thought that he was sure that the gutter would prove his refuge for the night; and what can one do in a refuge, except dream?
Each molecule of the gutter bore away a molecule of heat radiating from Gringoire's loins, and the equilibrium between the temperature of his body and the temperature of the brook, began to be established in rough fashion.
If you can't stand the coldness of my sort of life, and the strain of it, go back to the gutter.
You know I can't go back to the gutter, as you call it, and that I have no real friends in the world but you and the Colonel.
Clara had a startling eyeopener when, on being suddenly wakened to enthusiasm by a girl of her own age who dazzled her and produced in her a gushing desire to take her for a model, and gain her friendship, she discovered that this exquisite apparition had graduated from the gutter in a few months' time.
Those behind urged on, and the column, from gutter to gutter, telescoped upon itself.
He fished from his pocket a cigar stump, self-evidently shot from the gutter, and prepared to put it in his mouth to chew.
They now thought of placing the boxes across the gutter, so that they nearly reached from one window to the other, and looked just like two walls of flowers.
Then the customer of comparatively tender years would get suddenly disconcerted at having to deal with a woman, and with rage in his heart would proffer a request for a bottle of marking ink, retail value sixpence (price in Verloc's shop one-and-sixpence), which, once outside, he would drop stealthily into the gutter.
There was a short, narrow, gloomy lane or street, shut in between lofty dwelling houses, the lane often dark, always filthy, without sidewalks, a gutter running through the centre, over which, suspended from a rope, hung a dim oil lamp or two--such was the Rue St.
All the pens in the centre of the large area, and as many temporary pens as could be crowded into the vacant space, were filled with sheep; tied up to posts by the gutter side were long lines of beasts and oxen, three or four deep.