Gross

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Gross

The amount before any subtractions are made. For example, the amount that a person earns from an employer represents his gross income. He then subtracts his tax liability and other deductions to arrive at his net income.
References in classic literature ?
A fresh mode of Beauty is absolutely distasteful to them, and whenever it appears they get so angry, and bewildered that they always use two stupid expressions - one is that the work of art is grossly unintelligible; the other, that the work of art is grossly immoral.
It is grossly selfish to require of ones neighbour that he should think in the same way, and hold the same opinions.
A PIBA spokesman said: "[It's a] relief since it was a grossly inequitable tax on the pensions savings of private sector workers primarily.
Yet, the media's use of language like "Islamist terrorist cell", "suspected Islamists" or "Islamist attacks" ('Belgium deploys troops', GDN, January18) is at best blatantly biased and grossly prejudiced and orientalist.
Gay marriage is grossly immoral I'VE always respected the Birmingham Mail's readers' opinion page.
As well as the disabled and not disabled, I feel sorry for our hard working nurses who not only will have to pay more for registration fee, and now pay grossly inflated charge for car parking to a private company.
The pair, both of Moorlands Avenue in Dewsbury, were accused of sending an article of an indecent or grossly offensive nature.
Responding to a question at the High Pay Centre, Cable said of sky-high salaries like those earned by One Direction: "Much of it is downright insensitive and grossly immoral.
Davies admitted sending a grossly offensive message by public communications network.
He had pleaded guilty to a charge of sending grossly offensive electronic material and was due to be sentenced at the city's magistrates court.
This is grossly unfair and I will continue to seek support for the Fair Funding Campaign for West Midlands Police Service.
As well as taking into account the number of followers a Twitter member has, Starmer also suggested that prosecutors would in future assess the intent behind material that could be considered grossly offensive, as well as the impact it has on targets.