A

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Related to grave accent: acute accent

A

Fifth letter of a Nasdaq stock symbol specifying Class A shares.

A

1. A symbol appearing next to a stock listed on NASDAQ indicating that the stock is a class A share. All NASDAQ listings use a four-letter abbreviation; if an "A" follows the abbreviation, this indicates that the security being traded is class A. Publicly-traded companies sometimes issue common shares of different classes, which usually affects the shares' voting rights. Class A shares usually, but not always, carry more voting rights than class B shares.

2. Indicating a class of mutual fund with a front-end load. In this case, a certain amount of one's investment is deducted for the mutual fund's salesperson's commission. This lowers the size of the investment in the mutual fund. For example, if one invests $50,000 in a mutual fund, a certain amount, say $1,000, is deducted for the commission, resulting in an investment of only $49,000 in the fund.

A

An upper-medium grade assigned to a debt obligation by a rating agency to indicate a strong capacity to pay interest and repay principal. This capacity is susceptible to impairment in the event of adverse developments.

a

1. Used in the dividend column of stock transaction tables in newspapers to indicate a cash payment in addition to regular dividends during the year: 2.75a.
2. Used in money market mutual fund transaction tables in newspapers to indicate a yield that may include capital gains and losses as well as current interest: AmCap Reserv a.
References in periodicals archive ?
It's often nice to think we are mutating properly, or that we can use our apostrophes correctly in English, or that we know where to place our acute and grave accents in French, but the important thing with Welsh is to speak it as and when you can - that is all that speakers of the other languages do - and they seem to be quite healthy
True to his conviction that Love is music, Casoni deployed rhetorico-musical vocabulary to amorous ends in his own poetry, to wit: "After sweet singing, / If you breathe calmly, / Acute and grave accents, / Musical sighs, / Imitations, rhythms, and songs / Learn to repeat [what is said by] amorous souls.
How witty Casoni was, to refer to a poem already quoted, in weaving "musical sighs, imitations, rhythms, and songs," along with "acute and grave accents," into his amorous verses