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Graph

A representation of numbers signifying different data sets. Graphs are vitally important in tracking past performance of economic data with the aim of predicting its future behavior. For example, a government agency may create a graph of unemployment claims over time. If claims have trended downward, the agency may predict that unemployment may remain low. Graphs are also crucial for technical analysts, who use them to track securities' performance to help make investment decisions. Graphs are also known as charts.

graph

See chart.

graph

a means of portraying data in pictorial form that shows the relationship between an INDEPENDENT VARIABLE and a DEPENDENT VARIABLE by labelling and scaling the two axes of the graph to represent the two variables, plotting joint values of the two in the space between the axes and joining these values with a line. Frequently, graphs show time as the independent variable, depicting by means of a line how the dependent variable has changed over time.
References in periodicals archive ?
Graph database technology has been the fastest growing category of database in recent years.
However, if we think about trees in the context of a graph database where many traversals are required to make sense of connected data we'd ideally prefer lower cost complexity access.
S: Degree: Order and size in Intuitionistic Fuzzy Graphs.
Balanced bipolar intuitionistic fuzzy graphs, International Research Journal of Engineering and Technology (IRJET),Volume: 03 Issue: 11, 806-812 (2016).
In this paper, we defined the term of fuzzy magic graphs with fuzzy magic constant Moreover, some families of fuzzy graphs are proved as fuzzy magic graphs.
We plan to explore our research work for new branch say soft fuzzy graph labeling and soft fuzzy magic labeling graphs, intuitionistic fuzzy label graphs and intuitionistic fuzzy magic graphs we also want to find application of these classes in different real life problems.
Graphs 4:4:1, 4:5:1, and 4:6:1 contain triangles and therefore cannot be knight subgraphs; for each of the other three graphs the figure shows a sample chessboard labelling as proof that they are knight subgraphs.
The search for counterexamples to the Four-Color Conjecture motivated the study of cubic graphs with chromatic index 4.
Five fundamental papers [GKP10, Gr11a, PKG10, KPG10, PKG12] of the first author and his co-authors Khan and Poshni have established methods for calculating the genus distribution of a graph that is constructed by various kinds of amalgamation of graphs of known genus distribution.
In this phase students explore the construction of different types of graphs using the same data.
The number of possible protocol graphs depends on the number of functional blocks in the pool.
Solairaju and Ambika [3] have showed that the connected graph [E.