Grand

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Grand

In the United States, a slang term for multiples of $1,000. The term "big ones" is also used. For example, "10 grand" and "10 big ones" both mean $10,000.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the United States, felony criminal prosecutions are instituted in one of two ways: by indictment, which is a formal charge approved by a grand jury upon its finding that the offense stated in the indictment is supported by probable cause, or by information (sometimes called a complaint), which is a formal charge prepared by a prosecutor and filed directly with the court with no prior review by a citizen body.
Missouri law governing grand jury practice is limited.
I don't think they had the votes, so they put out this pretty sleazy report and didn't indict him," said Randall "Buck" Wood, an attorney who worked for Bullock in various jobs over the years, and who was called to testify before the grand jury that investigated his old boss.
The accusations that the grand jury made were no worse, no more grievous, than Bullock's normal flamboyancy," he said.
But when it comes to accuracy and transparency in grand jury proceedings, Oregon is failing.
We still rely on nonverbatim handwritten "minutes" of grand jury sworn testimony taken by one of the jurors.
Q: How was the grand jury different from other juries?
A: The grand jury can determine only whether probable cause exists to indict Wilson, not whether he is guilty.
Conversely, prosecutors are less likely to require "prosecution-friendly" witnesses to testify in the grand jury (e.
Although witnesses always retain the ability to assert the Fifth Amendment privilege against self-incrimination, witnesses called before a grand jury cannot refuse to testify on the grounds that their participation would be irrelevant or burdensome -- or that the anticipated questions would be improper or embarrassing.
7) Appearing before the grand jury in June 2008, the appellant testified for approximately three hours and fifteen minutes on "highly technical and ancient subject matter.
Many are familiar with the Peter Zenger grand jury that twice refused to do the king's bidding and issue an indictment for seditious libel.