Grade

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Grade

(1) A designated ground level. (2) To change the contours of land.

References in periodicals archive ?
Adding and subsequently removing a grader would be disruptive.
Brianna Lewis, rising sixth grader at Sterling School (K-8)
360 Grader Produktdesign is a design consultancy that delivers product design, mechanical engineering, advanced thermal analyses, prototyping, and production specifications to its clients.
For example, use of cigarettes in the past 30 days as reported in 2007 was 7% among 8th graders (compared with a peak of 21% in 1996), 14% among 10th graders (compared with a peak of 30% in 1996), and 22% among 12th graders (compared with a peak of 37% in 1997).
And while past-year abuse of OxyContin decreased significantly among 12th graders (from 5.
In fact, some third graders (25%) engaged in the aforementioned memory strategy twice within a given recall protocol [i.
In one set of analyses, they compared the abstinence reasons between sexually inexperienced females and males, and between 12th graders and ninth graders; in a second set, the same comparisons were examined among sexually experienced students.
Kindergarten children told mostly fantasy stories, first and second graders told mostly realistic fiction, and third graders told mostly personal narratives.
Graders are paid $15 an hour and must provide a minimum of three seven-hour days each week.
Sixth graders drifted into slumber slightly more than 1 hour after second graders did and about 25 minutes after fourth graders did, the researchers report in the May DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY.
Berliner says Gallagher's assertion that 57 percent of American fourth-graders cannot read is "nonsense" and adds, "1 do not believe there is any data whatsoever that would say that 57 percent of fourth graders are unable to read.
Alcohol use remained nearly stable among 8th and 10th graders as well, with nonsignificant decreases in lifetime and past-year measures and nonsignificant increases in the past-month assessment.