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General Obligation Bond

In the United States, a municipal bond in which the issuing locality pledges to use all revenues at its disposal to pay bondholders, including the raising of property taxes. Should a sufficient number of residents not pay their property taxes that it impacts revenue for bondholders, the terms of the bond legally require the municipality to raise property taxes to make up the shortfall. There are two basic types of general obligation bonds. A limited GO allows for the raising of property taxes up to a certain percentage, while an unlimited GO theoretically allows the municipality to levy taxes of up to 100% of a property's value. Because an unlimited GO provides a great incentive to pay property tax on time, and because many states only allow such a bond to be issued following a vote on the matter, credit ratings agencies usually rate them higher. However, both types of GO are generally rated highly.

Goes

To trade, especially at a given price. For example, one may say that a stock "goes" at $10, meaning that one may trade at its current share price of $10.

GO

References in classic literature ?
I can't tell thee where I'm going, and thee must say to her I'm gone on business as nobody is to know anything about.
Poyser, after pursuing his walk for a little while, went on, "I'll be bound she's gone after trying to get a lady's maid's place, for she'd got that in her head half a year ago, and wanted me to gi' my consent.
He had no warrant for the certainty that she was gone to Arthur.
She's been gone to Leeds this fortnight, and I couldn't learn from th' old woman any direction where she is at Leeds, else I should ha' brought it you.
If the Poysers learned that he was gone away again, Adam knew they would infer that he was gone in search of Hetty.
He was about to start on a long journey--a difficult one--by sea--and no soul would know where he was gone.
It was not a rumbling time of the year, and the gentlemen being most of them gone out of town, Tunbridge, and Epsom, and such places were full of people.
So I left her, took the fellow up to my chamber, gave him the trunk, or portmanteau, for it was like a trunk, and wrapped it about with an old apron, and he went directly to his boat with it, and I after him, nobody asking us the least question about it; as for the drunken Dutch footman he was still asleep, and his master with other foreign gentlemen at supper, and very merry below, so I went clean off with it to Ipswich; and going in the night, the people of the house knew nothing but that I was gone to London by the Harwich wherry, as I had told my landlady.
This I did because I knew the Dutch gentlemen and their servants would be upon the road that day, either in the stagecoaches or riding post, and I did not know but the drunken fellow, or somebody else that might have seen me at Harwich, might see me again, and so I thought that in one day's stop they would be all gone by.
The young ladies had been all married or gone to London; the old gentleman and the old lady that had been my early benefactress all dead; and which troubled me most, the young gentleman my first lover, and afterwards my brother-in-law, was dead; but two sons, men grown, were left of him, but they too were transplanted to London.
If I got $8,000 at the beginning of the month--it was all gone by the end of the month.