globalization

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Globalization

Tendency toward a worldwide investment environment, and the integration of national capital markets

Globalization

The integration of global markets by the reduction trade barriers, improved communication, foreign direct investment, and other means. Globalization allows a multinational corporation to make a product in one country and sell it in another. This provides jobs in one country and less expensive goods in the other. Globalization also allows for the free flow of capital between countries, which many believe spurs economic growth. Proponents of globalization argue that it allows developing countries to continue and hasten their levels of development, and that it protects consumers in developed countries. Opponents believe that globalization serves the interests of multinational corporations at the expense of small businesses, which sends jobs to other countries needlessly.

globalization

the tendency for markets to become global, rather than national, as barriers to INTERNATIONAL TRADE (e.g. TARIFFS) are reduced and international transport and communications improve; and the tendency for large MULTINATIONAL ENTERPRISES to grow to service global markets. See INTERNATIONALIZATION.

globalization

the tendency for markets to become global, rather than national, as barriers to INTERNATIONAL TRADE (e.g. TARIFFS) are reduced and international transport and communications improve, and the tendency for large MULTINATIONAL COMPANIES to grow to service global markets.
References in periodicals archive ?
JTI's Web Globalizer guides companies step-by-step through the complex process of globalization - from the initial consulting phase all the way to full-scale content maintenance and management of multilingual Web sites.
Globalizer integrates seamlessly into any web page so that pricing is available to the purchaser in the currency of their choice without having to leave the web page.
The favorite refrain of totalitarians throughout history is now uttered by the serial globalizers who insist that membership in sovereignty-sapping bodies such as the EU and NATO is the only option for any self-respecting European country.
According to the article, accounting firms were already among the more aggressive globalizers as "they took over consultancy businesses, finance companies, and law firms, setting themselves up as global chains of one-stop shops.
This globalization is happening in the context of unequal relations of power so that we have to extend our language (and thereby our thinking) to acknowledge that there are those in the privileged position of globalizers and those who are being globalized.
According to Professor Mark Levine the "neo-liberal globalizers and neo-conservatives, and ultimately the Bush Administration, would latch on to creative destruction as a way of describing the process by which they hoped to create their new world orders", and that "creative destruction [in] the United States was, in the words of neo-conservative philosopher and Bush adviser Michael Ledeen, 'an awesome revolutionary force' for (C*) creative destructionC*"
During its golden age of growth from 2002 to 2006, Turkey became one of the most prominent globalizers in terms of exposing its trade and finance sector to global trends.
The new southern globalizers promoted unregulated markets, pushed policies that helped deindustrialize older industries, and at the same time, provided lucrative incentives in recruiting Asian and European companies to southern states.
If you guessed such latter-day globalizers as the United States or Britain, you flunked.
During the negotiation and ratification of NAFTA, we market-oriented types who supported it--"neoconservative globalizers," as Clarkson would call us--argued that it would not be a new constitution, not even a new economic constitution, for North America.
Such states are vulnerable, and the past is littered with small and successful globalizers that lost out because of power politics: the Italian city states of the Renaissance, the Dutch Republic, or, in the twentieth century, Lebanon and Kuwait.
A burgeoning movement among alternative globalizers proposes a revival of the commons as an alternative.