globalization

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Globalization

Tendency toward a worldwide investment environment, and the integration of national capital markets

Globalization

The integration of global markets by the reduction trade barriers, improved communication, foreign direct investment, and other means. Globalization allows a multinational corporation to make a product in one country and sell it in another. This provides jobs in one country and less expensive goods in the other. Globalization also allows for the free flow of capital between countries, which many believe spurs economic growth. Proponents of globalization argue that it allows developing countries to continue and hasten their levels of development, and that it protects consumers in developed countries. Opponents believe that globalization serves the interests of multinational corporations at the expense of small businesses, which sends jobs to other countries needlessly.

globalization

the tendency for markets to become global, rather than national, as barriers to INTERNATIONAL TRADE (e.g. TARIFFS) are reduced and international transport and communications improve; and the tendency for large MULTINATIONAL ENTERPRISES to grow to service global markets. See INTERNATIONALIZATION.

globalization

the tendency for markets to become global, rather than national, as barriers to INTERNATIONAL TRADE (e.g. TARIFFS) are reduced and international transport and communications improve, and the tendency for large MULTINATIONAL COMPANIES to grow to service global markets.
References in periodicals archive ?
But, international migrations, as they accompany international capital and information as part of globalization today, just as in the past, do not take issues of family preservation into account.
22) While journalists remind us that globalization often pulls children into new work contexts this is very unlikely in Europe or the United States precisely because, after the late 19th century, Westerners began to view child labor as unnatural and abhorrent.
In fact, there is no better demonstration of the potential for gender change that globalization offers (and threatens) than this new pattern.
25) Gender patterns and maternal obligations lie deep within culture and contemporary trends affecting married women's migration in the context of globalization have as much, if not more, potential for cultural destabilization, as child labor or child migration do.
While globalization is having effects worldwide, those effects are neither the same everywhere nor have uniform consequences.
Thus, contemporary globalization may be effectively distinguishable from earlier migrations in its altered effects on patterns of social mobility.
Despite the late-19th century example, it's hard to see globalization reversing.
For all its merits, globalization must never be taken for granted.
The benefits of globalization in terms of investment, jobs, and competition are there for all to see, on cable television screens as well as in the shops and soukhs.
Therefore, it is hard see how globalization could reverse.
But for the moment, continued globalization of the world is both necessary and inevitable.
Other things being equal, economic globalization will continue.