globalization

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Globalization

Tendency toward a worldwide investment environment, and the integration of national capital markets

Globalization

The integration of global markets by the reduction trade barriers, improved communication, foreign direct investment, and other means. Globalization allows a multinational corporation to make a product in one country and sell it in another. This provides jobs in one country and less expensive goods in the other. Globalization also allows for the free flow of capital between countries, which many believe spurs economic growth. Proponents of globalization argue that it allows developing countries to continue and hasten their levels of development, and that it protects consumers in developed countries. Opponents believe that globalization serves the interests of multinational corporations at the expense of small businesses, which sends jobs to other countries needlessly.

globalization

the tendency for markets to become global, rather than national, as barriers to INTERNATIONAL TRADE (e.g. TARIFFS) are reduced and international transport and communications improve; and the tendency for large MULTINATIONAL ENTERPRISES to grow to service global markets. See INTERNATIONALIZATION.

globalization

the tendency for markets to become global, rather than national, as barriers to INTERNATIONAL TRADE (e.g. TARIFFS) are reduced and international transport and communications improve, and the tendency for large MULTINATIONAL COMPANIES to grow to service global markets.
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite this, Rudd can, in the midst of a crisis, denounce the 'economic orthodoxy' that his predecessors pioneered whilst simultaneously praising the vision and strength of Australia's key individual globalisers and economic reformers.
The case of Mexico tends to support the argument of the World Bank (2002: 5), according to which rising income inequality observed for Latin American globalisers is "due to prior extreme inequalities in educational attainment".
29) In other words, globalisation has turned against the globalisers, playing to the advantage of countries which have demonstrated the ability to absorb modern technologies and maintain competitive labour costs and which are in the possession of resources essential for sustaining high economic growth rate.
FDI flows and trade integration in the region or beyond for Pakistan are below par when compared to other mainstream globalisers.