Bug

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Bug

A problem with a computer or similar device that causes it to function incorrectly. A bug can cause significant slowdown or even failure of a project. As a result, many companies spend a great deal of time "de-bugging," or fixing as many bugs as they can find, before releasing software or other programs.
References in periodicals archive ?
TOKYO - Tokyo stocks opened higher Thursday on hopes for a global economic recovery following improvements in manufacturing data in the eurozone and China for January in trading hit by a system glitch.
Docomo said, adding that it will analyze the cause of the glitch in detail to prevent a similar trouble from happening again.
The probe was launched at the request of Congress which argued that a glitch in the electronic control system in Toyota vehicles could have been behind sudden unintended acceleration.
Dozens of shoppers moaned about yesterday's glitch on Twitter.
FAA officials said the glitch, which lasted for five hours on Thursday, forced airlines to enter their flight plans manually.
Guy Hachey, president and chief operating officer of Bombardier Aerospace, during an earnings conference call today said the CRJ1000 progrmme experienced a software glitch in July.
At least we hope it was a glitch - and not a prediction.
The first glitch was that the 36-year-old homeowner did not answer her door when Bachleda knocked on it, giving the three burglars a false signal that the house was ripe for robbing.
The cause of the glitch was not immediately known, nor were any details available on how widespread it was.
A computer glitch at the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport on 19 April cost Delta Air Lines more than USD1.
Noah Webster's descendants says there are three definitions for a glitch.
In the top1 mutant, the poppy's natural chemistry has a glitch that stops the normal process of making morphine, which is prized as a drug by itself and as a raw material for opiates such as heroin.